Tappering Off of Current COVID Surge Could Extend ‘Well into Next Year’

While Humboldt County’s latest — and most deadly — COIVD-19 surge appears to be on the downward slope, the descent is likely to be a slow one that could extend “well into next year,” with occasional mini-surges, according to county Health Officer Ian Hoffman. “Today’s COVID-19 case rates have dropped to the lowest rate they’ve been in the past 2 months. However, case rates remain very high, higher than they were during the peak of the previous surges in winter and spring of this past year,” he said in a written report to the board of supervisors. If the state’s “Blueprint for a Safer Economy” were still being used, Humboldt would fall into the highest transmission level — the purple tier — and under the Centers for Disease Control data tracker, the county continues to be in the “Red, High Transmission” tier, his report states. “The worst is not over yet and we need to remain vigilante,” Hoffman said at a Sept. 29 news conference. In the latest round of genomic sequencing, the Delta variant accounted for 98 percent of Humboldt County cases, Hoffman said.…

Public Health Confirms 121 New COVID Cases, Four New Hospitalizations

Humboldt County Public Health reported this afternoon that it has confirmed 121 new COVID-19 cases since Friday with four new hospitalizations. The new cases — which come on the heels of 243 confirmed last week — come after laboratories processed 545 samples with a test-positivity rate of 22.2 percent. After recording a test-positivity rate of 10.1 percent in July — the highest for any month since the pandemic began — the rate in Humboldt County jumped to 15.9 percent in August and 15.2 percent in September, far outpacing state (3.1 percent) and national (8.1 percent) rates. Through the first four days of October, it has spiked to 20.5 percent. A state database shows 19 people currently hospitalized with COVID-19 locally, with five under intensive care. The local hospital census peaked Sept. 3 with 42 COVID-19 patients. Public Health offered new data Friday on so-called breakthrough cases of fully vaccinated individuals, noting that one of the five deaths and two of the 14 hospitalizations recorded over the previous week were in fully vaccinated people. According to the county’s dashboard, 56 percent of the local population is now fully…

Here’s Redlands Symphony’s first in-person concert since before the pandemic

After more than 18 months without in-person concerts, the Redlands Symphony Orchestra will open its 2021-22 season Saturday, Oct. 9, with “An Historic Return,” a concert featuring guitarist Renê Izquierdo in Joaquin Rodrigo’s “Concierto de Aranjuez.” The concert begins at 8 p.m. in the University of Redlands Memorial Chapel. Ransom Wilson, the orchestra’s music director, will conduct the Redlands Symphony in a program that also includes Aaron Copland’s “Fanfare for the Common Man,” Mozart’s “Magic Flute” Overture, “Lyric for Strings’ by George Walker and Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony. Highlighting the orchestra’s return to live concerts will be a salute to regional first responders who will attend as the orchestra’s guests. Appearing as guest conductor for the orchestra’s traditional performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner” at the beginning of the concert will be Helen Staples-Evans, senior vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer at Loma Linda University Health. Staples-Evans was nominated by her peers as someone who was constantly on the front line of patient care throughout the pandemic, according to a news release. First responders who were invited to attend are from Beaver Medical…

Hospitalizations continue trending down in Riverside County

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to go down in Riverside County. There were 17% fewer confirmed patients in the hospital with the virus and 20% fewer confirmed patients in intensive care units. The county also saw a 5% drop in deaths reported in the week ending Monday, Oct. 4, compared to the prior week, according to data released by the county. Riverside County added 3,499 new coronavirus cases in the past week. That’s up from the prior seven-day total, which looked artificially low because the state was cleaning up data and removing older, duplicate cases. Longer term, the number of new cases has been trending downward. County data also show that 12% fewer residents got their first vaccination and 24% fewer residents became fully vaccinated. However, the county gave out 5% more vaccine doses over the last week, which may reflect more residents getting booster shots. On Friday, Oct. 1, Riverside County’s coronavirus death toll surpassed 5,000. Here are the latest numbers. Vaccination and hospitalization data comes from the state and is as of Sunday, Oct. 3. Other numbers were reported by the county Monday. Riverside County…

No more oil leaking, efforts continue to contain spill and find cause

Officials said no more oil is leaking into the waters off Huntington Beach, but weather and ocean flows will be key as they try to contain the spill that has already spread down as far as Dana Point. In response to a question, officials with Amplify Energy, which operates the offshore oil rig believed to be the source of the leak, and with the U.S. Coast Guard said at a news conference Monday afternoon, Oct. 4, they’re looking into a ship’s anchor striking and rupturing a pipeline as a possible cause of the spill of at least 126,000 gallons of oil. Amplify CEO Martyn Willsher said the company hasn’t yet pinpointed the origin of the spill, but it has inspected 8,000 feet of pipeline and found an “area of interest.” Divers were expected to go down Monday afternoon for a closer look. Asked whether one of the many cargo ships at anchor waiting to enter the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach could have caused damage to the pipeline, Willsher said it’s a possibility that is part of the ongoing investigation. Port officials deferred…

Longer California Wildfire Season Poses New Threat To State’s Wildlife

AUBURN (CBS13) — Wildfire season appears to be year-round now in California, and that is posing a relatively new threat to the wildlife who call the state’s forests and brush home. One method of wildfire prevention is proving to be harmful to these animals. “We took in 3,700 animals all of last year, we are already over 4,700 animals this year,” said Sallysue Stein, founder and acting executive director of the Gold Country Wildlife Rescue. Gold Country Wildlife Rescue has already taken in more than 1,000 animals this year compared to last, due mainly to wildfire-prevention work like tree-cutting. “Because of all the tree-trimming that’s going on by PG&E and homeowners who are being forced by their insurances to clear brush and clear trees,” Stein said. She says, typically, tree-cutting would be done in the winter months when there are no babies, but it’s year-round now. “Every one of those trees that comes down is full of babies during baby season,” she said. Stein added, “We actually capture the animals sedated, and work on it for a couple hours, cleaning its wounds, giving it medication.…

Sheriff: All Remaining Caldor Fire Evacuation Orders And Warnings In El Dorado County Now Dropped

EL DORADO COUNTY (CBS13) — All evacuation orders and warnings in El Dorado County due to the Caldor Fire have now officially been lifted. The El Dorado County Sheriff’s Office announced that any remaining warnings and orders have been rescinded on Monday. Residents who were being kept out of the area can now return home, but authorities are still urging people to stay vigilant about fire conditions. No orders or warnings were still in effect in either Alpine or Amador counties. #CaldorFire Per El Dorado County Sheriffs Office: All areas of Evacuation Warnings and Orders are being rescinded. All Warnings and/or Orders within El Dorado County have been lifted. At this time there are no Evacuation Orders or Warnings remaining in El DoradoCounty. pic.twitter.com/AWr5oLwA2B — EldoradoNF (@EldoradoNF) October 4, 2021 As of Monday, the US Forest Service reported that the Caldor Fire was now 93 percent contained. It has burned a total of 221,775 acres. Full containment is expected by Oct. 16, the forest service says.

Gov. Newsom Signs New Law That Aims To Reduce Deaths Among Black Moms

SACRAMENTO (AP) – Black women in California are more likely to die within a year of pregnancy than women of other races, prompting a wave of policy changes this year in the nation’s most populous state that culminated on Monday with Gov. Gavin Newsom signing a new law aimed at reducing the disparity. The law, among other things, creates a new committee within the Department of Public Health to review maternal deaths throughout the state by interviewing family members and doctors while exploring records and other reports. The law is the last piece of what’s been nicknamed the “Momnibus” bill – a reference to the legislative term “omnibus” that generally means one bill that combines multiple pieces of legislation on a number of topics. Most of the “Momnibus” changes this year happened in the state budget, which Newsom signed into law over the summer. California now will give lower-income women health insurance for up to one year after pregnancy instead of for two months. The state’s Medicaid program, a government-funded health insurance plan for the poor, will also now pay for doulas – trained professionals…

Students Say High School Football Player Used Item To Assault Teammate, Shared Video Online

MINNEAPOLIS (CBS Minnesota) —  Disturbing new details about why a Minnesota high school canceled its football season have been uncovered by WCCO-TV in Minneapolis. School leaders and police in the city of Proctor won’t talk specifics, but multiple students told the CBS station about a locker room assault and the video that spread on social media. “Everyone’s just super stressed. It’s just hard,” Phoenix Koski told WCCO. With her guardian’s permission, Koski, a senior at Proctor High School, talked about the controversy unfolding over the last two weeks. A senior year she was looking forward to after so many changes from the pandemic the two years prior. “It’s bad, it’s bad,” she said. Now, no football season after what Koski says she saw posted on social media. Multiple students claim two football players held down another player as a third, older teammate used an item to sodomize that player held on the ground. “I think it was gross. Really gross,” another high school senior, Tony Villebrun, said. Students told WCCO it took days for school officials to find out as video and pictures circulated among classmates on Snapchat. “I think…

San Diego-based senator fights to change program that decides SVP placements

DOWNTOWN (KUSI) – As residents fight the placement of sexually violent predators being placed in their communities, some lawmakers want to end or change the process altogether. The Conditional Release Program, or CONREP, has been under the microscope in recent months with advocates calling for change. KUSI’s Hunter Sowards was live in Downtown San Diego with more details. Categories: Good Evening San Diego, Local San Diego News, Politics

San Diego veterans return home from Honor Flight to crowd of hundreds

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Honor Flight San Diego resumed trips to the nation’s capital after a two-year hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A whopping 93 World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam War veterans took part in this years-long, awaited flight. Little did they know what would be waiting for them when they returned. Visit www.honorflightsandiego.org to nominate a future Honor Flight recipient. Categories: KUSI, Local San Diego News

N.Y. mother, son arrested in theft of Pelosi’s laptop that was stolen during Capitol riot

A New York mother and son have been charged with theft in aiding the disappearance of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s laptop during the Jan. 6 insurrection after the FBI initially raided a home 4,500 miles away in Alaska, looking for the computer. The FBI on Friday arrested Maryann Mooney-Rondon, 55, and her son, Rafael Rondon, 23, of Watertown, New York, in connection with the stolen laptop, according to court documents. Both also face other charges related to the riot at the Capitol. Rafael Rondon also faces possession of an unregistered sawed-off shotgun charge Both appeared in federal court Friday in Syracuse, New York, and released pending further proceedings, according to a statement from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of New York. A message left at a listing for Mooney-Condon in Watertown was not immediately returned Monday. Attempts to locate Rafael Rondon were not immediately successful. The Capitol riot was well documented by those who took part. Law enforcement used photos from the social media accounts of those who took part to search for the suspects. A tip to the FBI led them…

Contra Costa County sheriff’s deputy’s trial opens with conflicting narratives about 2018 killing  of Laudemer Arboleda

MARTINEZ — Did Deputy Andrew Hall gun down a mentally ill man moments after thrusting himself into a slow-moving car chase, in violation of Contra Costa Sheriff’s Office guidelines? Or was Hall trying to save his life during a nightmarish encounter that left him with only seconds to act? Those conflicting narratives emerged Monday as prosecutors opened their case against Hall, a sheriff’s deputy on trial for voluntary manslaughter in the November 2018 shooting death of 33-year-old Laudemer Arboleda. The fatal shooting was one of two by Hall over the last three years — the second, of Tyrell Wilson, coming earlier this year after the Contra Costa Sheriff’s Office cleared Hall of wrongdoing in Arboleda’s death, allowing him to return to work. On Monday, prosecutors focused solely on the first of those deadly encounters — painting a picture of a sunny Saturday afternoon in Danville that turned bloody mere seconds after Hall arrived on scene. Before prosecutor Colleen Gleason said a single word, she played a video of Hall pulling up to Arboleda’s vehicle, jumping out of his cruiser and running behind it before unloading…

Oakland A’s braintrust dissects disappointing season, uncertain future

Bob Melvin has charted 11 Oakland A’s teams through the baseball season. Six of those teams have made the postseason. Three have finished in last place in the American League West. “This is probably the first team since I’ve been here that didn’t make it to the postseason that I thought was a postseason team,” he said. And while this particular team could easily be kept intact and run back for another go at the postseason in 2022 — most are either under team control or attainable in free agency — uncertainties within the organization may make that a difficult task. Not only are the New York Mets sniffing around the A’s front office hoping to swoop up Billy Beane and Melvin, A’s ownership is threatening a move to Las Vegas amid stale negotiations to open a new ballpark at Howard Terminal. Beane and general manager David Forst couldn’t commit to keeping this team intact — for a few reasons. First, the A’s were eliminated from postseason contention on Wednesday and have yet to have discussions with owner John Fisher about the payroll budget for…