Sacramento

Red Bluff Joint Union High School trustees receive final update before school begins

RED BLUFF — The Red Bluff Joint Union High School District Board of Trustees received a final update Tuesday from Superintendent Todd Brose before school starts Thursday at Red Bluff High School. Brose said teachers and substitute teachers have been training to learn the school’s new coronavirus protocols and measures. Substitute teachers are required to go through the training before being allowed to teach. All teachers were given a thermometer, screening papers, gloves and disinfectant. Principal Rich Hassay planned to hand out schedules to the teachers Tuesday, Brose said. Those schedules were intended to be sent to parents later that night or by Wednesday. “As soon as the kids know where they are going, that will be good,” said Board President Kathy Brandt. There will be two lunch periods to reduce student contact. Brose said 315 students have signed up for distance learning. Those students will still receive breakfast, lunch and supper. The school will host a drive-through 9-10 a.m. for students to pick up their the meals. Students with disabilities who attend school in person will still receive the resources they need, Brose said.…

Pickup crashes through wall at FoodMaxx in Red Bluff

RED BLUFF — No one was injured Tuesday morning when a woman crashed a pickup through an outside wall at FoodMaxx at the Belle Mill Shopping Center. There were no injuries in a crash about 9 a.m. Tuesday at FoodMaxx. (Julie Zeeb — Daily News) Police responded to the incident about 9 a.m. Tuesday and learned the driver, whose name was not released, had mistaken the gas pedal for the brake pedal and the white Dodge pickup collided with the building, bursting through into the men’s bathroom, said Sgt. Kevin Busekist. “Had anyone been standing inside (the restroom) it would have resulted in serious injury or a fatality,” Busekist said. “Fortunately, no one was in there and there were no injuries, but it did considerable damage to the bathroom, including a water leak.” The woman, a 69-year-old Red Bluff resident, was not hurt, Busekist said. The damage to the men’s restroom extended into the women’s restroom. One of a few employees assisting in assessing damage and cleaning up the area said he was outside of the building on a break when the crash occurred. After…

Outdoor events return to Tehama District Fairground

RED  BLUFF — The Tehama District Fairground has been approved for holding outdoor equestrian events with modifications, according to a press release issued recently. Talks for reopening plans began June 2, when the fair board approved three June equestrian events to be held if clearance was given from Tehama County Public Health Officer Dr. Richard Wickenheiser. Fair CEO Mandy Staley said a reopening plan was submitted in May that was approved once the sector the fairground falls under was cleared. A rider participates in a rodeo event in 2017 at the Tehama District Fairground. ( DN file) A press release on the fairground website Aug. 5 stated, “With the help of California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA), Tehama County Department of Public Health, Dr. Wickenheiser, and Val Lucero the fairgrounds has been approved to hold events with a modified plan. Similar to restaurants being able to open for modified outdoor dining, the fairgrounds have been approved for outdoor events with additional safety measures in place. To protect the health of our community, contestants, staff and volunteers the fairgrounds has adopted new measures to ensure…

Despite ICE order, students likely to be deported

The Student and Exchange Visitor Program, a Department of Homeland Security unit that oversees non-immigrant students, recently announced that higher education students taking mostly online classes may not be allowed to remain in the United States. In its bulletin that affects F-1 and M-1 visa holders, Immigration and Customs Enforcement made clear that students attending schools operating fully online or in hybrid instruction mode may not remain in the U.S. Prospective students whose chosen universities offer online-only education will not be allowed to enter. Students currently enrolled in such programs must either transfer to schools that offer in-person learning, leave the country voluntarily or risk deportation. ICE created understandable anxiety across U.S. universities. But its announcement isn’t a new immigration twist; rather the order represents compliance with existing immigration law which strictly limits the number of online classes an international student may take. For years, F-1 foreign students – more than 1 million are enrolled today – have arrived in the U.S., earned their degrees and returned home. The visa’s original intent is exactly that – students study here, go home and use their U.S-acquired…

The longer we’re isolated, the less productive we get

COVID-19 is getting old – particularly for employees who’ve been working from home for months. That’s the finding of a Wall Street Journal article, “Companies Start to Think Remote Work Isn’t So Great After All.” Early on, when millions stopped commuting and started working from home, many companies saw good results. Work was getting done. Most employees enjoyed it. Companies saw an opportunity to reduce future office overhead costs by making remote work part of their long-term strategy. But that was before cracks began to emerge in the work-from-home model. According to The Journal, initiatives now take longer. Hiring and integrating new staff is harder. Employees aren’t bonding or growing with each other. Efforts to collaborate online are going flat. One CEO puts his finger on the problem: It’s “vital to have individuals in a room and see physique language and skim indicators that don’t come by means of a display screen.” He’s exactly correct. Humans are social animals. We’re at our best when we collaborate face to face. Communication theorist Nick Morgan explains why in Forbes: “(W)e share mirror neurons that allow us to…

Community Medical Centers unveils new equipment to assist homeless in San Joaquin County

STOCKTON — Community Medical Centers has a new tool to reach some of the most vulnerable residents of San Joaquin County.On Monday, CMC unveiled its new Mobile Health Van, which will enhance the ability of the organization’s Care Link unit to deliver medical services to the homeless in San Joaquin County.The Mobile Health Van was funded by a $100,000 grant from Health Net. The van is stocked with medical supplies and equipment, and customized with electrical […]

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