Bay Area

Letters: Vaccine for racism | Training vs. candidates | Ethnic studies | Protect programs | Poverty and security

Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. Virus of racism has a vaccine A cartoon (Mike Luckovich, Page A11, May 31) shows a child of color sheltering in place with her father. She asks him a poignant question: “Daddy, is racism a virus?” The answer is, of course, “Yes, racism is a social virus, replete with a social DNA that can be revealed just as biological DNA can be revealed.” The racism virus is as insidious as the worst biological viruses that affect humanity, including COVID-19 that is currently wreaking havoc on our world, requiring shelter in place while awaiting a vaccine for protection. For the racism virus, there has been a vaccine available for many millennia. In one form or another, it is found in most religions and commonly known as The Golden Rule: Do to others what you would have others do to you. Applying this vaccine to our daily lives will benefit both oneself and the world around us. William Buchanan Livermore Making good police hires is most important Re. “Is state’s police training…

Letters: Training vs. candidates | Evergreen leadership | ‘Real patriotism’ | Support DA | Beware Trump | TikTok extortion?

Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. Good police candidates more critical than training Re. “Is state’s police training enough?,” Aug. 9: While training is important, more so is selecting the correct candidates to receive that training. The current battery of psychological tests do not seem to be working to weed out those who will become “thugs with badges.” The claim is there are only a few among all the good ones. It’s obviously more than just a few; and the departments have been loath to even try weeding them out. Why not do a better job before you even hire them? Bruce Onken Fremont Evergreen’s leadership has instructors ready As early as May 10, 2020, Byron Breland, the chancellor of the San Jose-Evergreen Community College District announced that 2020 fall classes were going to be online. As a math instructor at Evergreen Valley College, the move made perfect sense to me. The virus was not going away, and it would be impossible to socially distance my packed classes in which all chairs are often occupied. This…

The Bay Area moved thousands to coronavirus hotels and shelters. Now what?

Since the coronavirus pandemic began, the Bay Area has moved thousands of homeless residents off the streets, out of unsafe living situations and into hotels and make-shift shelters. But six months into the pandemic, as some temporary programs start to close, officials, nonprofits and the people they’re sheltering are grappling with one big question: What happens now? “We feel really lucky that we’ve been able to bring so many people inside, and of course no one wants to see us have to exit people to the streets,” said Kerry Abbott, director of Alameda County’s Office of Homeless Care and Coordination. “And we’re just working as hard as we can and as fast as we can to try to keep that from happening.” Officials are scrambling to get new housing approved and built at unprecedented speeds. They’re calling on private landlords to house homeless residents with subsidized rent. And they’re rushing to sign deals to buy hotels and apartment buildings before the state’s rapidly  approaching funding deadline. But officials say there’s not yet enough housing in the pipeline — or enough funding to build it —…

Downtown San Jose project with rooftop cafe takes big step ahead

SAN JOSE — A new restaurant and office project in downtown San Jose that will incorporate a historic building and feature a huge rooftop bar offering sweeping vistas of Silicon Valley has landed final development approvals, clearing the way for construction in 2021. The project would add a restaurant, retail, and offices to South First Street, in an area that executives with developer Urban Catalyst hope will evolve into a prime hotspot for downtown San Jose. The project fronts on South First Street and is adjacent to Fountain Alley and will incorporate a historic building that was built in 1889. “We believe Fountain Alley and that part of First Street can become a destination where people want to hang out,” said Erik Hayden, founder of Urban Catalyst. “We want to create a synergy with Fountain Alley.” This week, city administrators granted a permit to develop the site to the project’s developers, who immediately applied for a construction permit. Hayden predicts construction can begin sometime during the April-through-June quarter of 2021. “We’re a step closer today to starting construction on Fountain Alley, but we still have…

Turtle Beach’s Gen 2 Stealth 600 and Stealth 700 headsets have eye on next-gen consoles

Turtle Beach is getting a jump on the next generation of consoles by announcing the release of its second generation of its Stealth 600 and 700 headsets. The peripherals work with the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One currently but also have future compatibility with the PlayStation 5 and Xbox One X. So what’s new with the Gen 2 headset? Turtle Beach representatives said the company wanted to keep what fans liked and refine elements such as the build quality. Product manager Erin Steele said Turtle Beach wanted it to be more robust, and that shows up in the sturdier hinges and easily adjustable headband. Now, it’s simpler to make sure 600 and 700 have the best fit on the head. With the acoustic refinements, Steele said Turtle Beach reshaped the earcup to more of a D-shape. She says it fits better over the ear and creates a wider soundstage. Meanwhile, the cushioning keeps the ProSpecs indentations that make the headset more comfortable for those who wear glasses and he internal parts are also better suited to handle heavy bass. When it comes to communication, Turtle…

Ask Amy: My dying mother revealed a secret, and it’s weighing on me

Dear Amy: My 90-year-old mom died recently, and right before she died, she told us that her deceased sister had had a baby out of wedlock when she was a teen. Columnist Amy Dickinson (Bill Hogan/Chicago Tribune)  I had my DNA tested, and I looked into this. Sure enough, I found my new first cousin. My question is: Should I tell my three cousins that they have a half-sister? My husband says no, because my aunt took the secret to her grave for a reason and he thinks it will change their opinion of their mother. But I think that if I had a half-sibling, I would sure like to know about it. What do you think I should do? In the Know Related Articles Ask Amy: I can’t voice an opinion without risking my wife’s rage Ask Amy: I know he has photos of me, but he won’t hand them over Ask Amy: This game we played in school was so wrong, and the teacher is still teaching Ask Amy: I’m afraid I’ve damaged my amazing teenage daughters Ask Amy: My wife is furious…

Harriette Cole: Years later, I’m ashamed of my racist mistake. What can I do?

DEAR HARRIETTE: When I worked at a heavily visited tourist attraction, I had a visitor interaction that ultimately ended with me escorting said visitor to a colleague (whom we will call “Annie”). Harriette Cole  I am terrible with names, and I didn’t regularly work with Annie at the time. As I approached Annie’s desk, I realized her name was escaping me. I suddenly thought I recalled her name, so as I dropped off the visitor with her, I said, “OK, thanks, Jen will take care of you from here.” The second it came out of my mouth, I knew it was the wrong name, which is embarrassing on its own, but much worse because I called her the name of another co-worker, and both these women are East Asian. I am white. Even though I knew the name was wrong, Annie’s real name was escaping me so instead of correcting myself, I scurried off with my tail between my legs. Annie did not correct me, but I could see the disappointment in her eyes. It’s been at least four years since that incident, and Annie…

Miss Manners: I have problems with this co-worker, and I can’t tell our boss

DEAR MISS MANNERS: I work with someone who goes to any length to never learn new skills or handle any additional responsibilities for the company we work for. We are both managers at the same level. Judith Martin  On a daily basis, I usually work two to three hours of overtime just to complete my own job. But this co-worker never stays late for any reason whatsoever, and never attends any work event that occurs after her shift. I always do. Just the other day, while our boss was out of the office, my co-worker was shunting so many of her work responsibilities onto me that I was three hours late leaving work. But most importantly (I guess), my co-worker got to leave work on time. For another example, she recently asked me three times to do a task that had been given to her. When I finally refused, she got very mad and left my office, slamming the door on the way out. Needless to say, she has put me in a very uncomfortable situation. Related Articles Miss Manners: When a stranger shames a…

Dear Abby: My son’s wife is demanding I end my friendship with her father

DEAR ABBY: My 50-year-old estranged daughter-in-law was abused by her brother growing up, and her father defends the abuser, which upsets her no end. I’m friendly with her father because he has been nice to me, and this revelation was news to me. Jeanne Phillips  My daughter-in-law sent an email to me and others saying how hurt she is. I would like to respond, but since I’m friendly with her father, I’m not sure what to say. I want to tell her I am deeply sorry for her having been abused because it is extremely traumatic. Do you have any advice for me? I love my son and his family, and I don’t understand how things got this way between us. They no longer speak to me or let me (or my wife) have a relationship with my grandchildren, whom we love very much. HURT FATHER-IN-LAW IN TEXAS DEAR HURT: It is not surprising that your son and daughter-in-law are now estranged from you and don’t want you around their children. Related Articles Dear Abby: They treat him like a hero because they believe his…

San Jose: Two charged with operating meth conversion lab

SAN JOSE – Two men have been charged in U.S. District Court with operating a methamphetamine conversion lab in San Jose and distributing the drug, authorities said. In a news release, the U.S. Department of Justice said Mario Orozco of San Jose agreed to sell four ounces of methamphetamine to a “cooperating source” for $3,500, and on June 18, Teodoro Ayon-Ramos delivered the drug to the source in San Jose. Both men were arrested at their homes on Tuesday. According to court records, Orozco and Ayon-Ramos smuggled methamphetamine by dissolving it in buckets of paint and extracting it at a warehouse on Stockton Avenue in San Jose, where it was converted into crystal form, the department said. If convicted of the charges, the men each face a maximum sentence of 40 years and a fine of $5 million. Related Articles Fired San Jose teacher charged with coughing on kid at Yogurtland still sought by police DEA makes arrest at East San Jose home Coronavirus: Santa Clara County sees largest jail outbreak to date They said it: Trouble brewing in Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office Two…

Is it still illegal to park facing oncoming traffic? Roadshow

Q: I have noticed a large increase in the number of package delivery trucks pulling over into oncoming traffic and then either parking or double-parking facing oncoming traffic. The offenders are Amazon, UPS, FedEx, some white unmarked trucks or vans, occasionally a moving truck, and pickups (for plumbers, electricians, etc.) on the side against the flow of traffic. My theory is this saves a few steps and the time of crossing the street or making a U-turn to park correctly. Like Mr. Roadshow’s Facebook page for more questions and answers about Bay Area roads, freeways and commuting. There is also an increase in cars parked facing oncoming traffic. I thought this violated two traffic laws, driving on the wrong side of the street and parking in the wrong direction. Have the laws changed? I am writing to improve awareness in both the companies and drivers of these vehicles and in each of us. It might take a short second to do the right thing, but it might avoid a late or wrong decision and an accident. Henry Walasczyk, San Jose   A: You raise some…

Saratoga: One killed, five injured in two-vehicle crash

SARATOGA – One person was killed and five others were injured in a fiery two-vehicle crash in Saratoga on Wednesday, authorities said. The collision was reported at the intersection of Highway 85 and Saratoga Avenue about 11:20 a.m., said Luisa Rapport, a spokesperson for the Santa Clara County Fire Department. Authorities arrived to find one of the vehicles – a white sedan – engulfed in flames and stuck on an embankment, said Sgt. Michael Low of the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office. The second vehicle – a gray pickup truck – had major front-end damage. Low said two occupants of each vehicle were taken to hospitals, three of them with life-threatening injuries. One of the occupants of the sedan, a man in his 70s, died a short time later. The Santa Clara County Medical Examiner-Coroner’s Office will release the man’s identity once it has been confirmed and his next of kin is notified. Two witnesses were also treated at the scene for minor injuries and released, Low said. Saratoga Avenue was shut down in both directions for an investigation. The California Highway Patrol also closed…

California is ‘turning a corner’ on coronavirus pandemic, Newsom says

California appears to have turned a corner after a swell of coronavirus cases and hospitalizations earlier this summer, though the path toward economic recovery remains more precarious than ever. Hospitalizations have dropped to the lowest point in nearly six weeks, new caseloads have slowed down and the death toll has begun to level off — all “encouraging” signs that the virus’s grip has lessened in recent weeks, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Wednesday. But that positive message came as many out-of-work Californians anxiously wait key decisions on eviction and unemployment policies. “These are specific proof points that connect to some optimism that what we’re doing as a state … that what you are doing is working,” Newsom said, adding, “We want to continue to see these numbers go down.” In early July, Californians who got sick in the early weeks of summer began flooding hospital beds — prompting Newsom to shut down more sectors of the economy by the middle of the month. Hospitalizations statewide quickly ramped up to an all-time peak with more than 7,000 patients by July 21st; since then, California has shed a…

For Americans waiting virus relief, no new aid in sight

By Lisa Mascaro | Associated Press WASHINGTON — Americans counting on emergency coronavirus aid from Washington may have to wait until fall. Negotiations over a new virus relief package have all but ended, with the White House and congressional leaders far apart on the size, scope and approach for shoring up households, re-opening schools and launching a national strategy to contain the virus. President Donald Trump’s top negotiator, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, tried to revive stalled talks Wednesday, but House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer dismissed the “overture,” saying the Trump administration is still refusing to meet them halfway. Congressional Republicans are largely sitting out the talks. “The White House is not budging,” Pelosi and Schumer said in a joint statement. With the House and Senate essentially closed, and lawmakers on call to return with 24-hours notice, hopes for a swift compromise have dwindled. Instead, the politics of blame have taken hold, as the parties head into August focused on the presidential nominating conventions and lawmakers’ own reelection campaigns. Trump said the Democrats are “holding the American people hostage.” All indications…

San Francisco Fed president on pandemic’s ‘incredibly uneven’ impact

SAN FRANCISCO — The technology industry’s strong performance amid an economic downturn spurred by coronavirus lockdowns could be protecting the Bay Area from some of the worst damage of the recession even as brick and mortar businesses struggles and the loss of federal unemployment benefits signal trouble ahead, San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President Mary Daly said on Wednesday. Daly said many businesses such as online retailers, tech firms, shipping companies and others have been doing well amid government-imposed lockdowns even as hospitality, bars and other brick and mortar industries face widespread closures. That’s been a “shocking” aspect of the current financial contraction, she said. Mary C. Daly, President and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, spoke with reporters Wednesday, August 12, about the impact of COVID-19 on the economy. Courtesy of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco  “It’s been incredibly uneven,” she said. “If you just roll that up to bigger firms, you see that reflected in the stock market.” Apple’s stock is up almost 87 percent since lockdown orders were imposed in the Bay Area on March 16. Facebook’s stock is…

“He won us the game defensively:” Ramón Laureano robs a home run in A’s win

Manager Bob Melvin waited until the very last seconds before Wednesday’s first pitch in Anaheim before officially submitting the lineup. The A’s hadn’t heard back from Major League Baseball regarding Ramón Laureano’s suspension appeal — he wasn’t sure if their prized outfielder could play that day. But, no word came. So, Laureano played. He didn’t just play, the A’s might not have won without him. Laureano made a handful of game-saving defensive plays and knocked in two late-game insurance runs in Oakland’s 8-4, sweep-preventing win against the Los Angeles Angels. “He won us the game defensively,” A’s starter Chris Bassitt said. “He definitely saved us.” Laureano has a knack for the web gem outfield plays, and so many seem to happen at Angel Stadium. See: The 300-some-foot assist he made from outfield to first back in 2018. The ballpark’s low outfield walls provided a defensive gem of a different variety, when Laureano casually robbed Brian Goodwin of a potential game-tying home run in the seventh inning. “It’s never an easy play,” Laureano said. “I just got good timing on it.” The catch nearly mimicked the…

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