On Television

I can’t speak for anyone else — well, maybe I can — but I’ve been watching a lot of television. For most of a lifetime, of course, but especially in, oh, the last two years or so, I’ve been hooked on the thing. By which I refer to episodic television, in case that distinction was unclear. As glad as I have been to be granted access to first-run movies in abundance via streaming services, the supply has started to become diluted and diminished, much like our collective patience and stability in the face of the ongoing plague. The movie industry continues to struggle to adapt, attempting to predict or influence some sort of return to normal, while continuing to succumb to internal rifts and outmoded thinking. And so, for no good reason, we find ourselves lumbering into the traditional down-season of movie distribution. The fields aren’t exactly fallow but it takes more wandering to find sustenance. Which is only one excuse to turn to television — maybe not even an excuse. It’s become almost an aphorism that movies are the domain of the director, while…

“The Golden Rule”

Editor: I have been thinking about words and meanings and mentionings lately. We have an interesting habit in our world of using quite harsh and derogatory words in quick and clever and glib and mean ways. I could go through the alphabet and find a derogatory word that begins with each letter. You can, too. Yet just because we know a derogatory word, it does not mean we ought to use it toward one another (Mailbox, Jan. 20). Let’s step out of the mudslinging and the one-upsmanship in our communication, please. One of my terrific teachers who taught me about writing and speaking recommends that one look in the mirror and read aloud, or say out loud, something they want to say to someone else. Hearing it with your own ears and seeing yourself say it with your own eyes makes a difference. Are you talking to me? Remember the Golden Rule. Thanks for reading this out loud or not. Joanne McGarry, Arcata…

‘Glossing’

Editor: Last week’s Journal contained an insert from Redwood Coast Energy Authority that described its programs and projects for clean, renewable energy. Among the renewable energy resources listed is biomass — the black sheep of renewables. Burning biomass produces nearly a quarter of our electricity supply. It also emits approximately 284,000 metric tons of CO2 every year. That is close to 75 percent of all vehicle emissions per year in the county. People concerned about climate change would be thrilled if we could somehow figure out how to reduce vehicle emissions by 25 percent here. Abandoning biomass electricity would accomplish so much more. I was glad to see that RCEA has apparently removed biomass electricity from their upgraded REpower mix, and now can truly say it’s carbon-free. They can’t say that about their regular power mix, which is promised to be “100 percent net zero” by 2030. Most people don’t understand that term. They would be surprised to realize the high carbon emissions are entailed by RCEA’s contract to keep burning biomass into 2031. Adopting biomass energy to replace fossil fuels has been a spectacular…

Masking Life

I The Face producer of expressions holder of in and out looks through which life pours screening entire existences II The Face presenter of plot lines wrinkles in the story viewpoints of the eyes blue brown gray green III The Face connector of Beings assessor of feelings embracer of contacts deliverer of rejects IV The Face now a protector masked against strife a connections reflector holding onto life V The Face eyes speak hold one another above ever-bigger masks saying what isn’t said Nina Haedrich…

Driver Running Red Light Caused East Sacramento Crash That Killed Woman, Police Say

SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — A January 13 crash in an East Sacramento intersection that left one woman dead was caused by a driver running a red light, police confirmed on Wednesday. According to the Sacramento Police Department, traffic detectives confirmed that a driver entered the intersection of Folsom Boulevard and 60th Street against a red light. Two vehicles were involved and the woman, a parent, was crossing the intersection at the time of the collision, police said. Investigators said the driver wasn’t speeding and DUI was not a factor. The woman killed was identified by a Sacramento County coroner as Guadalupe Jimenez, 45. No arrests have been made. Sacramento police said the investigation will be turned over to the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office, which will determine if criminal charges apply.

Highway 49 Reopens Near Amador-Calaveras County Line Following Deadly Crash

CALAVERAS COUNTY (CBS13) — Highway 49 near the Amador and Calaveras county lines has reopened after a deadly crashed blocked the roadway for several hours Wednesday. The crash happened early Wednesday morning just south of Big Bar Road. Exactly what led up to the crash is unclear, but California Highway Patrol confirms that at least one person has died. Caltrans says the crash had blocked all lanes of Highway 49. Drivers were being urged to avoid the area or detour through West Point on Highway 26 or Burson Road to Camanche Parkway, or Wallace on Highway 12 to Highway 88 until the closure ended. Crews reopened the roadway just before 8 p.m.

Thursday’s Show Info (1/27/22)

Tahoe Blue Vodka Proud Partner of the San Francisco 49ers http://www.tahoebluevodka.com/recipes/ @tahoebluevodka The Sacramento River Job Fair Saturday, Jan. 29 10 a.m. through 1 p.m. (PT) Sutter Health Park West Sacramento http://www.rivercats.com/employment Sacramento SPCA Same-Day Adoption Appointments Tuesday through Saturday 6201 Florin-Perkins Road Sacramento 916.383.7387 http://www.sspca.org R Street Jewelry Shop Min-Fri 10am-7pm Appointment only Sunday 12-5pm Appointment only (916) 287-0084 http://www.vosswood.com @vosswoodco

Rancho Cordova Hosts Vaccine Clinic, Offers COVID Testing Kits

RANCHO CORDOVA (CBS13) — The City of Rancho Cordova hosted a COVID-19 vaccine clinic Wednesday afternoon where citizens and businesses were also offered testing kits. “We’ve had a lot of trouble trying to find test kits,” said Dave Bowman with Brookfields Restaurants. Bowman was one of 350 businesses signed up to receive free COVID-19 test kits and PPE at the vaccine clinic. “I want to make sure the staff is as safe as possible because this thing is spreading like wildfire,” he said. The clinic was sponsored by the city, the chamber of commerce and Del Paso Heights. It comes after calls from residents and businesses for help. Ashley Downton put it together. She says they had 900 test kits and PPE supplies, plus vaccines by appointment. “Whether you’re looking for your first dose, second dose or booster shot, we are providing that to anyone five years of age or older who lives or works in Rancho Cordova,” Downton said. The city has had a half dozen of these events over the course of the pandemic. “We all hope this pandemic would end, but if…

Public Health Reports Four New COVID-19 Hospitalizations, 241 New Cases

Humboldt County Public Health confirmed 241 new COVID-19 cases today — making 1,423 so far this week — as well as four new hospitalizations. The report comes on the heels of a record 2,010 new cases confirmed last week and make 5,501 new cases confirmed so far in January — more than 33 percent of the county’s cumulative case count through the 23-month duration of the pandemic. The current surge has been attributed to the highly contagious Omicron variant, which has been circulating locally at least since Dec. 19, and has sent case rates skyrocketing to unprecedented levels throughout the country. And locally, the surge only seems to be accelerating as where the county reported an average of 122 new cases per day the first week in January, the daily average increased 23 percent to 159 new cases per day last week and has ballooned to 287 new cases reported per day last week. Local officials, meanwhile, predict the current surge will reach its peak sometime in February. According to data released Friday from public health, over the past week, unvaccinated residents tested positive this week…

HSU is Now Cal Poly Humboldt

Humboldt State University has officially been designated California State University’s third polytechnic campus after the CSU Board of Trustees voted to approve the designation this afternoon. The school will now be known as California State Polytechnic University, Humboldt. Or Cal Poly Humboldt, for short. “We propose that Cal Poly Humboldt represents a triple threat,” HSU President Tom Jackson, Jr. told the CSU Committee on Educational Policy earlier this morning. “A polytechnic university in the northernmost part of the state will provide California with access to high academic programs while improving education and providing career opportunities on the North Coast.” The CSU Committee on Educational Policy unanimously approved the name change earlier this morning, with many of the CSU Committee on Educational Policy members fully endorsing the designation of Cal Poly Humboldt. “I just want to congratulate Humboldt State on the excellent work that it’s doing on this, it would be my pleasure to support this motion and I think this is just one of the most exciting things happening in the CSU and that’s saying something because there are many exciting things happening in this university.…

Student Housing is Tight. A California Plan Wants $5 billion for Affordable Beds

The University of California housed more students than the system officially had room for last fall. Yet UC leaders, lawmakers and the governor all want to dramatically expand student enrollment. But that ambition is at odds with a housing crunch crippling the UC and campuses across California. Students will need somewhere to live and a new legislative plan would throw in $5 billion to help the state’s campuses ramp up their housing stock. Assembly Bill 1602 by Assemblymember Kevin McCarty, a Democrat from Sacramento, would create a $5 billion fund that would lend money, interest-free, to public colleges and universities seeking to expand their supply of affordable housing. That much money could house around 21,000 more students, based on recent analyses that show campuses spend an average of roughly $240,000 per student bed when constructing housing. But even that may not meet the total need given how many students struggle with housing insecurity and homelessness. The plan builds on a $2 billion grant for affordable student housing lawmakers approved last year, and signals the state’s increasing commitment to tackle all the costs students encounter in…

Public Health Confirms Another COVID Death, 241 New Cases

A Humboldt County resident in their 20s has died of COVID-19, Public Health reported today, while confirming 241 new cases of the virus, continuing an already-record week that has already seen 1,816 cases confirmed. One new hospitalization was also reported today. So far in January, the county has confirmed 3,782 new cases of the virus — more than a quarter of the county’s cumulative case count throughout the 23-month duration of the pandemic. The current surge has been attributed to the highly contagious Omicron variant, which has been circulating locally at least since Dec. 19, and has sent case rates skyrocketing to unprecedented levels throughout the country. And locally, the surge only seems to be accelerating as where the county reported an average of 122 new cases per day the first week in January, the daily average increased 23 percent to 159 new cases per day last week and has ballooned to 302 new cases reported per day so far this week. Local officials, meanwhile, predict the current surge will reach its peak sometime in February. While early data indicates the Omicron variant is less…

Locally Filmed ‘The Sky is Everywhere’ Trailer Drops

The trailer for A24’s film adaptation of Jandy Nelson’s YA novel about a high school girl navigating grief over her sister’s death and budding romance has just been released and is bursting with Humboldt scenery. Redwoods, Old Town shops and coastal views abound with dream-like high school-theater effects, young lovers floating into the sky and supersaturated shots of roses in bloom. The Sky is Everywhere, which stars Grace Kaufman, Jason Segel and Cherry Jones, is looking as wholesome as a PG13 musical drama can be, and it streams on Apple+ starting Feb. 11.  …

No Peeking Behind the Nuke’s Fence

PG&E turns turtle while state coughs up waste stability data After a modest burst of self-congratulation upon finishing the physical decommissioning of its Humboldt Bay nuclear plant in November of 2021, PG&E has gone deeply silent in answering the Journal’s follow up inquiries into the long-term safety of the highly toxic radioactive waste now ensconced 44 feet above Humboldt Bay at Buhne Point. The lack of response raises concerns about hiding pitfalls in the future safety of the radioactive waste stored on the edge of the bay. While the utility can’t seem to get the power returned to many after the holidays’ snowstorms, stop sparking forest fires or avoid being fined by the state for ducking power safety inspections, it might claim a victory lap for burying its nuclear power plant that was shut down back in 1976. It could show us what’s behind its fence at its shiny, new nuclear waste site at King Salmon. PG&E’s plant won’t go all Chernobyl on us but the radioactive remains are here. While they’re packed up ready for a ride to someplace safer, that safer place doesn’t…

Not the Same

Editor: Lighten up, Sam Neuwirth! (Mailbox, Jan. 6) Equating “dick moves” with “cunt moves” ignores the millennia of women being treated as second-class citizens (still, earning on average 80 percent of what a man does for the same job). Equating “dick” with “cunt” is no more appropriate than likening the insult quotient of “whitey,” “honky” or “cracker” to the n-word, which is why I don’t write it out. “Dick” and “cunt” are in different categories. “Dick” = jerk = asshole (not to mention detective, etc.), often used lightheartedly (“Oh come on, don’t be such a dick!”) without reference to male genitals. “Cunt,” on the other hand, is genuinely insulting and clearly has misogynist overtones. If you’re interested, I wrote about the origins of “cunt” in my Field Notes column Nov. 2, 2016, under the (inspired!) heading, “Country Matters.” Barry Evans, Eureka…