Health

SB School District ensures no student goes hungry

San Bernardino City Unified School District is pleased to offer a free, nutritious breakfast and lunch to every student every school day for the 2019–2020 school year. Multiple studies have shown that when children experience hunger, it can have serious and lasting impacts on their physical and intellectual growth. According to Feeding America, children from homes that lack consistent access to food are more likely to develop language, motor skill, and behavioral impairments. The federal government established the National School Lunch Program in 1946 to provide students with a nutritious lunch to increase their potential to do well in school. The meal program has expanded over the years to provide more free- and reduced-price meals, including breakfast, to socioeconomically disadvantaged students. For many years, SBCUSD has provided free meals to students who qualified for free or reduced-price meals. Generally, students’ families had to apply and prove that they qualified under income guidelines. This year all students at every SBCUSD kindergarten–12th-grade campus are eligible to receive free breakfast and free lunch. “We are so proud to be able to offer this to our students and their…

Free dental clinic scheduled Sept. 27-28 at NOS

The California Dental Association and CDA are hosting a two-day CDA Cares dental clinic to provide free oral health care to approximately 1,900 people. Dentists and dental professionals will provide fillings, extractions, cleanings, limited dentures and partial dentures, root canals on front teeth, oral health education and assistance finding ongoing care. Patients are seen on a first-come, first-served basis Friday and Saturday, Sept. 27 and 28 (doors open at 5:30 a.m.) at the National Orange Show Events Center, 689 South E. Street, San Bernardino, CA 92408. No ID required, free parking. For more information, patients can call 877-516-8854 or visit cdafoundation.org/cda-cares/san-bernardino. The post Free dental clinic scheduled Sept. 27-28 at NOS appeared first on Inland Empire Community News.

Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital launches Red Nose Docs program with grand celebration

Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital celebrated the launch of the Red Nose Docs program and its recent partnership with Healthy Humor Inc. (HH) and Moose Toys on Tuesday, August 27th, a partnership that provides yet another tool to help patients in their healing process. Healthy Humor is a national nonprofit arts organization which, through their Red Nose Docs, uses the magic of theater and circus skills to reintroduce play as a welcome distraction for pediatric patients. Australian toy company, Moose Toys, partnered with HH to bring healthcare clowning to Children’s Hospital, and the Red Nose Docs will be rounding on various units twice a week to visit patients.  The celebration brought a welcome distraction for both inpatients and outpatients at the hospital with refreshments and various activities led by the Red Nose Docs, including juggling, plate spinning, tricks and crafts.  Belinda Gruebner, executive vice president of global marketing for Moose Toys, said the partnership between organizations would continue reaching the heart of Moose’s mission. “Our goal at the end of the day is to make kids ‘Superhappy’ — the work our Red Nose Docs do here…

How to manage the fear of loneliness in your life

Many people deal with the fear of living alone. Loneliness can make someone feel depressed and unhappy so its important to not let being alone be a factor in your life. Here is a list of techniques that a person can use so that the fear of being alone doesn’t become a major issue in their lives. 1. The first step is to find an activity that you enjoy and where you can meet a lot of people. For instance, joining a group activity such as a volleyball group, women’s club, or making crafts can be a great way to meet people. Doing something that you like to do will make you happy and will increase your chances of making friends. 2. Spending time with animals can be a great source of companionship. Whether you have a dog or you go to your local shelter, spending time with an animal or pet can help us to feel better. Animals can be of good company to all of us whether we are alone or not. 3. Helping others through community service can be of some help. There are many…

Stater Bros. Charities and Inland Women Fighting Cancer donate $125,000 to Loma Linda University Cancer Center

Stater Bros. Charities and Inland Women Fighting Cancer presented a check for $125,000 to the Loma Linda University Cancer Center on August 20. The funds were a portion of those raised at the 11th annual Believe Walk in October 2018. Judy Chatigny, MSN, executive director of Loma Linda University Cancer Center, said the donation will be used to support the psycho-oncology program, which assists with services not typically covered by insurance, such as psychologists, spiritual chaplains, financial guidance, dieticians, wig banks, and the new offering of massage services for patients. During the check presentation at Stater Bros. corporate headquarters, Chatigny said the Cancer Center is constantly finding new ways to serve patients. This year they have added a massage therapy service specifically for cancer patients. The therapists have been trained to service patients who are undergoing chemo.  In addition, Chatigny said the Cancer Center has hired a financial coordinator to help offer financial support to patients who need high-cost treatments. In 2019 alone, the center has received $2.6 million in free drug and co-pay assistance for patients.  “Patients face many challenges, and our focus is to at Loma Linda…

Three formerly homeless youth accepted into universities

In 2016, Roland was young man sleeping on the streets of Victorville. The effects of Roland’s untreated mental illness and his substance use disorder resulted in broken relationships and homelessness. His life changed the day he decided to visit the San Bernardino County Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) High Desert Transitional Age Youth (TAY) Center. Behavioral health staff conducted an assessment and guided him into treatment. Today, Roland, 24, is not only celebrating his recovery from a mental health and substance use disorder, but his graduation from San Bernardino Valley College and acceptance into California State University San Bernardino School of Nursing. Perhaps even more inspiring is that although Roland’s story may be extraordinary, it is not unique. This year alone San Bernardino County celebrated the recovery of two other formerly homeless youth who participated in TAY programs and have since graduated from community college and been accepted into four-year universities. Amir, 25, is attending Cal State San Bernardino and Wolfie, 21, is attending the University of California, Riverside. The success of these programs is due in part to their ability to provide intensive behavioral…

How parents can help their children deal with today’s mental health issues

Do you worry about how your son or daughter can handle today’s mental health issues such as bullying, peer pressure, depression, and addiction? Here are six suggestions a parent should follow in helping their children overcome the pressures of being a teenager in today’s stressful environment. 1. Talk To Your Teenager On A Regular Basis: One of the most important things a parent can do is to talk to their children about the current issues that they may be dealing with. Do not bombard your son or daughter with endless questions and do not get argumentative. Establish some kind of dialogue between you and your children so they will be willing to talk with you. 2. Education Is Key: Both parents should be familiar on the issues of bullying, suicide, addiction, and other mental health issues. Every teenager should be aware of the resources that are out there to help them and they should be aware of where to go for help. 3. Watch Out For Any Red Flags And Do Not Assume Anything: If you notice any changes in your teenager’s moods or behavior,…

Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital performs first pediatric robotic fundoplication in Inland Empire

Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital performed a robotic-assisted Nissen fundoplication surgery in July on a young patient, ridding him of lifelong painful reflux issues and further extending the hospital’s use of robotic surgery for children. Edward P. Tagge, MD, pediatric surgeon at LLU Children’s Hospital and Victoria Pepper, MD, pediatric surgery fellow, performed the procedure. Tagge said the robot surgical system allowed for a more precise, seamless surgery for the physician  and a better recovery for the patient. “The robot provides improved dexterity, tremor filtration, greater degrees of freedom and improved optical magnification,” Tagge said. “Patients who undergo robotic-assisted procedures have more precise surgical procedures and potentially shorter hospital stays.” The procedure involved wrapping the upper curve of the stomach around the esophagus. The patient — 5-year-old Daniel Velasquez from Bloomington, California — was diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux or GER a few months after his premature birth and soon developed severe gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD. He went through hundreds of tests, medications, sleepless nights, food restrictions, allergies, near-constant burning throat pain and ear pressure discomfort. In his five years, he had never slept a full…

Lessons I have learned from my 20-year struggle with fear and anxiety

Do you currently struggle with fear and anxiety and wish you could talk to someone who can relate to your situation? If so, I dealt with fear and anxiety for over 20 years and here are some lessons I learned during my mental health struggles. 1. Listen To The Professionals And Not Your Friends: Your friends may mean well, but when it comes down to it, the professionals know your situation more than anyone. They know what you are going through and are trained to deal with your situation. Consult with a counselor when you have questions about your mental health issues. 2. Distance Yourself From People Who Give You A Hard Time: Distance yourself from those people who won’t make an effort to help understand what you are going through. You need to surround yourself with positive and supportive people. I felt better when I avoided those people who would constantly argue with me regarding my anxieties and stresses. 3. Focus On The Facts of Your Situation And Not Your Thoughts: When people are depressed they rely on their fearful and negative thoughts.  Your…

How to survive a panic attack when it strikes

Do you experience panic attacks and do not know what to do? A person can experience a panic attack when they least expect it. This can cause a great deal of fear and anxiety for the person. As a result, here are six easy steps a person can follow when a panic attack strikes unexpectedly and how to overcome anxiety. 1.Take A Break: The first thing a person must do when experiencing a panic attack is to stop whatever they are doing. A panic attack can be very uncomfortable and can affect a person’s everyday thinking. Take a break to help regain your sense of comfort. 2.Take Deep Breaths: A person should take some deep breaths to help feel better and to get rid of some of the excessive fear and anxiety. There are also many kinds of breathing exercises a person can learn to follow with the help of a mental health counselor. Taking some deep breaths can help a person relax right away. 3.Distract Yourself: A person should try to distract themselves from the panic they are experiencing. A person could get some…

The importance of being your own advocate and how it saved my life

By Lisa Harrison, Educator I’m a teacher and I have never had an interest in the medical field but becoming a survivor of Neuroendocrine Tumors (NET) changed me. I am a busy mother of two with a full-time career with an unusual hobby. I spend my evenings and weekends researching NET and other related conditions. This hobby was born from personal necessity as I started my journey with the illness. Neuroendocrine tumors or NETs begin in certain cells and secrete hormones in quantities above and beyond normal ranges. These excess hormones produce dangerous symptoms. Hormones called adrenaline (the “adrenaline rush” we all know about) and noradrenaline are produced, which can increase heart rate and blood pressure to dangerous levels. The exact cause of NETs is not known but family history and genetic make up are significant contributors. My medical episodes began about six years ago as a slight feeling of adrenaline. They happened once a month and lasted a few minutes. Thinking my blood sugar was low, I would eat a snack and go on with my day. At my annual physical I told my…

School of Nursing receives $2.6 million grant to increase the number of advanced practice registered nurses in the I.E.

Loma Linda University School of Nursing has been awarded a four-year, $2.6-million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help grow the number of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in the Inland Empire. The grant, from the federal department’s Advanced Education Nursing Grant Program, will provide funding toward tuition assistance for qualifying students and enhance training. The school recently received confirmation of the funding for year one of the 4-year grant, a $684,848 installment. “This grant will allow us to update and enhance the training provided to students,” said Gloria Mattson Huerta, DNP, Nurse Practitioner program coordinator and assistant professor at Loma Linda University School of Nursing. “This will include the development of standardized patient scenarios focusing on behavioral health issues, as well as managing the opioid crisis — both of which are significant issues in the Inland Empire as well as nationally.” Pete Aguilar, Representative for California’s 31st U.S. Congressional District, has promoted adding HHS funding to provide high-quality affordable healthcare in the state’s medically-underserved communities. “By increasing the number of highly-qualified nurses in our region, we can help ensure better health outcomes…

Governor Newsom’s “Mental Health Czar” visits Behavioral Health

Last week, Dr. Thomas Insel, the internationally renowned neuroscientist and psychiatrist appointed by Governor Gavin Newsom to be his special advisor on mental health, visited San Bernardino County to learn about its behavioral health programs. Insel visited San Bernardino County Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) clinics, residential treatment facilities, and participated in a ride along with the Homeless Outreach Support Team, a mental health team that provides supportive services to homeless individuals living on the streets. He also viewed an RV which had been transformed into a mobile clinic, and visited several DBH clubhouses, recreation centers that support individuals with a mental health disorder. At the Desert Stars Clubhouse in Barstow, members shared their stories of recovery and presented Insel with a Certificate of Appreciation for his long outstanding support of mental health. “Dr. Insel is interested in learning from the ‘little people’ and we appreciate that,” said clubhouse member Rey French. “As I visit counties around California, I am continually impressed by the commitment and the creativity of the people delivering behavioral health services,” Insel said. “San Bernardino is such a great example of…

CUSM Class of 2023 focused on service, healthcare for all

Jelena Begovic grew up in Southern California watching her mother care for others as a practicing physician in Pomona. Now, the Wellesley and Boston University graduate is a member of the California University of Science and Medicine, School of Medicine (CUSM) class of 2023, and hopes to follow her mother’s footsteps in her home state. “I am excited to return to my community and to Southern California,” said Begovic, one of 98 students to take the Hippocratic Oath during the second annual White Coat Ceremony July 20. “It would be an honor one day to serve my community as a physician and to keep my family tradition alive.” CUSM is one of the nation’s newest medical schools, founded as a public-private partnership to establish a world class medical university that will address the critical shortage of physicians, improve health disparities and population health, and address the needs of underserved areas such as the Inland Empire of California where it is headquartered. CUSM was made possible through the support of the Prime Healthcare Foundation, Arrowhead Regional Medical Center and the County of San Bernardino and shares…

Awareness event highlights services for children, parents

August is Child Support Awareness Month and San Bernardino County Department of Child Support Services (DCSS) is reminding parents that they are here to offer a range of services to assist parents in supporting their children. DCSS invites parents to attend events aimed at celebrating the department’s purpose of making a positive difference in the lives of children, as well as supplying resources to provide help building stronger, healthier families. Thursday, Aug. 1 from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., DCSS will hold its first-ever Back to School Health and Resource Fair. The department will hand out free backpacks (on a first-come, first-serve basis), offer free dental screenings, free vaccinations, free haircuts, CPR demonstrations, story time, cooking and much more through partnerships with local community agencies. The event will take place at DCSS office located at 10417 Mountain View Ave., Loma Linda. During Mondays with DCSS, the department will host representatives from social service agencies at its three offices in  Loma Linda, Victorville and Ontario. While child support customers wait to meet with their case workers, they will have the chance to meet with staff from other…

Wellness camp gives community kids tools to make wholesome lifestyle choices

Loma Linda University Health last week concluded its 12th annual Operation Fit, a series of week-long wellness camps for Inland Empire children and their families to learn how to live healthier lives through sensible food choices and physical activity. This summer, 75 kids, ages 9 to 15, participated in each of the three Operation Fit camps held June 24 through July 19 at Loma Linda University Health. Camps were led and staffed by Loma Linda University School of Medicine and School of Public Health medical students, pediatric residents, and dietetic students. Through dynamic, interactive educational activities, campers learn how portion control, read food labels and incorporate more fruits and vegetables in their diet. Kids were also introduced to fun exercise games and physical activities. Marti Baum, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics at Loma Linda University School of Medicine, said camp participants are referred by SAC Health System pediatricians and family medicine physicians if the patient’s Body Mass Index (BMI) is over the 85th percentile, which means the child is considered overweight or obese. “Children with elevated BMIs often move into type 2 diabetes by the time they reach their 20’s,” Baum said. “A proactive approach…

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