Inland Empire

Colton Woman’s Club awards scholarships to high school sophomores April Nunez, Cinthya Cerrato

The 2020 HOBY Award Scholarship bestowed by the Colton Woman’s Club was awarded to sophomores April Nuñez of Colton High School and Cinthya Cerrato of Bloomington High School on Tuesday, January 14. The esteemed HOBY Award Scholarship given out each year by the club pays for the students to attend the Hugh O’Brien Youth State Leadership Seminar, a three- to four-day conference focusing on leadership skills. This year the event will happen in June at Cal Poly Pomona with approximately 150 other students from around the country. Applications for the award are taken by the school’s counseling office, and students must complete an essay discussing why the leadership conference would be beneficial to their future plans. Once the Colton Woman’s Club HOBY Committee picks the winners, the students and their families, along with their counselors and the County Superintendent of Schools Office is invited to the General Membership meeting for the award presentation. This year both students read their essays to those present. Speaking words of encouragement about leadership to the students prior to presenting their certificates and scholarships, Colton Mayor Frank Navarro offered the…

France’s Macron tells global CEOs: ‘We’re open for business’

France’s president is taking on the role of salesman in chief for his strike-battered country. Emmanuel Macron used the splendor of the Palace of Versailles to woo international business leaders on Monday, insisting that his reforms are attracting investors despite six weeks of crippling protests and walkouts over his plan to overhaul the retirement system. Driving home the message that the eurozone’s second-largest economy remains open for business, Macron’s government announced a 2 billion-euro ($2.2 billion) contract for the French shipyard of Saint-Nazaire on the Atlantic coast. It will build two cruise ships for the company MSC, representing some 2,400 jobs over three years. MSC confirmed plans to build other ships in France for another 4 billion euros ($4.4 billion). “Good news doesn’t arrive out of nowhere. It comes because we are implementing reforms, because our country is moving, mobilizing,” Macron said. “I know that our heads are being filled with bad news and that we’re led to believe that everything is going to explode. But it’s not true.” Macron delivered those comments to workers at a plant of British-Swedish pharmaceuticals company Astrazeneca in the…

Riverside marches for Martin Luther King, unity for 27th time

Residents of Riverside and surrounding areas marched again Monday, Jan. 20, to honor Martin Luther King Jr. Participants in the 27th annual Martin Luther King Walk-A-Thon dance near the statue of Martin Luther King Jr., after walking to the site in Riverside on Monday, Jan. 20, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Cal Baptist University students dance by the Martin Luther King Jr. statue after walking there Monday, Jan. 20, 2020, during the 27th annual Martin Luther King Walk-A-Thon in Riverside. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Sound The gallery will resume inseconds Michelle O’brien, a 65-year-old Riverside resident, carries dog, Joey, while dancing near the Riverside statue of Martin Luther King Jr., after the 27th annual Martin Luther King Walk-A-Thon on Monday, Jan. 20, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Participants in the 27th annual Martin Luther King Walk-A-Thon gather at the statue of Martin Luther King Jr. in downtown Riverside on Monday, Jan. 20, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Participants in the 27th annual Martin Luther King Walk-A-Thon arrive at the statue of Martin Luther King Jr. in downtown…

State funding approved for Colton Area Museum

The Colton Area Museum Association announces major improvements coming to the Colton Area Museum and the building that houses it.  All will be made possible by $900.000 funding procured by Assemblymember Eloise Gomez Reyes. The City of Colton and the Museum Association have enjoyed a mutually beneficial partnership since 1984. The museum, with its rich trove of historical objects, is recognized as a significant asset to the community. It is housed in the former Carnegie Public Library building, which is now a historical landmark. The City is responsible for maintaining the building and leases it to the museum at $1 per year. “Assemblymember Reyes has brought us desperately needed funding,” stated Museum Association President Mike Murphy. “It will allow the City of Colton to make major upgrades to the 112-year-old building. It will permit valuable enhancements to the exhibitions and functioning of the museum.” Dr. Tom Rivera, Association Board Member, explained that funding will allow purchase of much needed technology and media resources, display cases, maintenance equipment, and storage space.  “To maximize use of these purchases,” Rivera stated, “there will be extensive work ahead. We…

Six months to go for Hemet’s Florida Avenue median project

Here’s the good news about the controversial construction of a concrete median down parts of Hemet’s Florida Avenue: It’s about halfway over. The $13.1 million project, which began in July, shuts down one of the two lanes of State Route 74 — known as Florida Avenue in Hemet — between Acacia Avenue and the Ramona Expressway from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. weekdays. Officially known as the “State Route 74 (SR-74)  Raised Curb Median Safety Project,” the project is expected to be finished in June, weather permitting, according to Caltrans spokeswoman Joy Schneider. Cars travel along Florida Avenue near the remodeling of an In-N-Out restaurant and construction of a concrete median between Acacia Avenue and the Ramona Expressway in Hemet on Friday, Jan. 17, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Hemet’s In-N-Out restaurant is seen closed Friday, Jan. 17, 2020. The remodeling coincides with construction of a median along Florida Avenue in the city. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Sound The gallery will resume inseconds A sign alerts customers that the In-N-Out restaurant on Florida Avenue in Hemet is closed. Construction of a…

Californian credit scores take nation’s second-largest jump

The average Californian’s credit score may be middle-of-the-pack nationally, but only one state had a bigger improvement as the economy rebounded during the last seven years. Credit watcher Experian’s annual report on national trends in “FICO” credit scores showed that last year’s California average of 708 was up two points in a year. That ranked 27th among the states. Credit scores reflect bill-paying abilities and are an important factor in how consumers obtain loans and what interest rates are charged. The national average FICO score rose as well to a record high of 703 in 2019. That’s up from 701 in 2018. A 700 score is a critical credit quality yardstick for lenders and 59% of Americans hit or exceeded this lofty level of creditworthiness last year — a record high share. At the state level, 2019’s highest scores were found in Minnesota at 733, its eighth-consecutive year leading the nation. Next best was North Dakota and South Dakota at 727. Worst? Mississippi and Louisiana at 677 then Texas and Alabama at 680. Things have certainly changed for the better for personal finances since 2012,…

Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla Indians hopes hemp production will raise up to $3 million a year

Industrial hemp, grown on a reservation near Idyllwild, may be coming to a store near you. The Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla Indians has received the green light from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to begin growing hemp on its reservation. The tribe is one of three in the nation to receive the approval, according to the tribe. The Santa Rosa band is a small tribe of about 139 members over the age of 18, about 70 of whom live on their 11,021-acre reservation, according to the tribal website. The Santa Rosa are a non-gaming tribe without a casino. “The tribe was trying to venture into the cannabis arena a few years back,” tribal Vice Chairman Steven Estrada said. Steven Estrada, tribal vice chairman for the Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla Indians, points toward the site where hemp will be grown on tribal land near Mountain Center on Friday, Jan. 17, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A view of the Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla Indians’ tribal land near Mountain Center on Friday, Jan. 17, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Sound…

Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai says it’s ‘no question’ artificial intelligence needs regulation

With several Bay Area cities moving to stop the use of facial recognition technology, the chief executive of one of the area’s tech giants has come out in favor of stricter, and more widespread regulation of such types of artificial intelligence technologies. Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai said there is “no question” that AI needs more regulation in order to prevent the potential negative effects of the use of technologies that include facial recognition and so-called “deepfake” videos. Pichai made his views public in an opinion piece he wrote for the Financial Times on Monday. Pichai said that as the head of Google parent company Alphabet, it is his “privilege to help to shape new technologies that we hope will be life-changing for people everywhere,” and that he believes AI is “promising.” However, Pichai stressed that there is a dark side to AI that calls for some form of greater oversight over the technology. “Artificial intelligence needs to be regulated,” Pichai said. “It is too important not to. The only question is how to approach it.” Artificial intelligence is often defined as computer systems that have been…

Developer plans houses for historic Redlands orange grove at Heeney estate

A white two-story home built around 1891 by Redlands pioneers will be spared, but the 8.8 acres of orange groves that are part of the estate are set to become houses, a letter from the developer states. The prairie-style Heeney house on West Palm Avenue was constructed by Thomas England, who built Prospect Park a few blocks to the southeast. The house is flanked by about 675 thick-trunked Washington navel orange trees whose blossoms on warm spring days produce a “heavenly” scent, according to neighbor Martha Carlson. In his backyard overlooking the grove Stuart Sweet, a former pilot, said there are only a few local landmarks that can be seen from the air, and that big square grove is one of them. “There aren’t a lot of other landmarks because it’s just one big suburb,” Sweet said. Around the first week of January, a representative of Diversified Pacific Communities started knocking on doors handing out letters alerting nearby residents to their plans. The developer purchased the property in June 2019, and is in a preliminary planning stage to build homes on the site, according to…

13-acre church project in Rimforest could move forward – 16 years after first pitched

A Lake Arrowhead church’s plan to build a new campus in Rimforest is headed to a San Bernardino County panel — 16 years after it introduced the idea. On Thursday, Jan. 23, the Planning Commission will consider giving Church of the Woods a permit to build a 13.6-acre religious facility that would include a youth center, gymatorium, recreational facilities, sports field and assembly building, on 27.12 acres of vacant land north of Highway 18. The project has been criticized by environmental groups and residents concerned about its size and the potential impacts to wildlife and traffic. Pat Hopkins, the church’s project manager, said the plans are well done. The project was first approved by the Planning Commission in 2004, but was delayed after environmental groups appealed to the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors over the lack of an environmental impact report, Hopkins said. A proposed school and a second sports field were eventually removed from the plan, Hopkins said. “The project has changed quite a bit since the original proposal,” Hopkins said. “The new changes, we feel are positive, and the county asked us…

Smog, taxes and home-building doomed this Inland Valley couple’s orange grove

Forrest and Ferna Doucette didn’t need to do much research to realize their days as citrus ranchers were numbered. The Doucettes owned orange trees in the western portion of San Antonio Heights north of Upland until the early 1950s. They had purchased an experimental orchard originally planted by John S. Armstrong, the famed plant developer and founder of the Armstrong nursery company which began in Ontario. This was an unusual grove because among other types, Armstrong tried to develop smaller orange trees. His hope had been for a shorter tree that would make it possible for workers to harvest the fruit without ladders. Initially, the trees produced lots of fruit — “they had to put two-by-fours under the branches to hold them from breaking,” explained Doucette, during an Aug. 2, 1982, oral history with the Ontario Library. The trees were a dwarf version, but at the same time probably didn’t produce nearly as much fruit as larger trees. Reality set in for the Doucettes as air pollution and the advent of suburbia in the area doomed the grove on today’s Mesa Terrace. “When the citrus…

Retiring Quiel brothers reflect on sign business’ 60 years in San Bernardino

There’s a room on the second floor of Quiel Signs in San Bernardino where brothers Larry, Jerry and Gary Quiel would take prospective clients for a look at their family business. Through a window overlooking the service and installation yard, corporate decision makers could see in real time how smoothly the intricate and rather complicated process of billboard and sign making went under the Quiels’ watch. Below, designers worked collaboratively with metal professionals and electricians, themselves working closely with the paint and assembly teams. “The reward for work well done is the opportunity to do more,” asserts a sign mounted above the main doorway. Six decades after their late father opened Quiel Brothers Signs off Base Line Street in San Bernardino, sons Larry, Jerry and Gary will close the beloved family business this year to retire. “At Christmas and all the holidays,” Jerry said, “it used to tick my mom off because we’d talk about work because it was so interesting. This is the most interesting business because you meet so many people throughout the years. “We’ve met a lot of good people and we’ve…

Redlands wins 38th annual San Bernardino County mock trial competition

Rancho Cucamonga High School’s Riley Esparza displays evidence as she speaks from the witness stand during the finals of the 38th annual San Bernardino County Mock Trial competition at Foothill Law and Justice Center in Rancho Cucamonga Saturday afternoon Jan. 18, 2020 against Redlands High School. Nearly 30 schools competed in the competition during the preceding weeks with Redlands High School and Rancho Cucamonga High School squaring off in the finals. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) Rancho Cucamonga High School’s Uesili Kuli addresses Judge Michael Sachs during the finals of the 38th annual San Bernardino County Mock Trial competition against Redlands High School at the Foothill Law and Justice Center in Rancho Cucamonga Saturday afternoon Jan. 18, 2020. Nearly 30 schools competed in the competition during the preceding weeks with Redlands High School and Rancho Cucamonga High School squaring off in the finals. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) Redlands High School’s Matthew Le points towards a diagram as he addresses Judge Michael Sachs during the finals of the 38th annual San Bernardino County Mock Trial competition against Rancho Cucamonga…

Learn tricks from a snake oil pitchman at Redlands museum’s Old West Days

Scott Semenic, from San Diego checks the cards dealt to him from dealer Tony “Pipes” Johnson, from North Hollywood, during the 2nd annual Old West Days at the San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands Saturday Jan. 18, 2020. Activities included quilting, leatherworking, rope lassoing, posing for old style photographs in western clothing, and trying their luck at various card games (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) W. C. Wynn, from Chino, tries out an old child’s game during the 2nd annual Old West Days at the San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands Saturday Jan. 18, 2020. Activities included quilting, leatherworking, rope lassoing, posing for old style photographs in western clothing, and trying their luck at various card games (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) Caroline Palestine, from San Bernardino, and her daughter Vivienne, 3, try their hand at lassoing during the 2nd annual Old West Days at the San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands Saturday Jan. 18, 2020. Activities included quilting, leatherworking, rope lassoing, posing for old style photographs in western clothing, and trying their luck at various card games (Photo…

Women’s March 2020 kicks off what figures to be a heated election season

The crowd arrives at the stage in front of City Hall for the 4th Annual Women’s March LA in Los Angeles on Saturday, January 18, 2020. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) The crowd takes to the street for the 4th Annual Women’s March LA in Los Angeles on Saturday, January 18, 2020. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) A woman chants while holding her sign during the 4th Annual Women’s March LA in Los Angeles on Saturday, January 18, 2020. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Signs can be the spark that starts a conversation as it did for Diane Balisy, left and Joy Rogers right during the 4th Annual Women’s March LA in Los Angeles on Saturday, January 18, 2020. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) Women leading the way up Hill Street during the 4th Annual Women’s March LA in Los Angeles on Saturday, January 18, 2020. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) The crowd gathers around the stage in front of City Hall during the 4th Annual Women’s March LA in Los Angeles on Saturday, January 18, 2020. (Photo by Brittany Murray, Press-Telegram/SCNG) L-R Lisa Solomon…

Sock was missing for a year, but it all came out in the wash

Small things can bedevil us. Like laundry. For instance, over a year ago I lost two socks. Losing socks happens all the time to some people, particularly parents with a lot of socks to keep track of. But it’s a rare thing for me. Naturally the two socks I lost weren’t from the same pair. That would be too lucky. I kept the two lone mismatched socks in my sock drawer, hoping their mates would one day turn up and they could be reunited. Putting on a sweater a few weeks later, I found a stray sock inside. Obviously laundry cling was involved. The sock and sweater must have been in the dryer together and decided to stay together. “I know we come from two different worlds, you and I, but…” So, perhaps willingly, perhaps not, that sock was reunited with its mate. They’ve been spooning in my sock drawer ever since. That left one stray sock in the drawer and one lost sock. I hoped it would turn up inside another sweater. But at the time, winter was turning to spring and it was…

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