Far North

Pedestrian Killed in Orleans Hit and Run

A pedestrian was killed in a hit-and-run crash on State Route 96 in Orleans shortly before 8 p.m. yesterday. According to the California Highway Patrol, the pedestrian — whose identity is being withheld until family can be notified — was reportedly walking in the middle of the roadway when hit by a black Toyota pickup that fled the scene southbound on State Route 96. The pedestrian died at the scene. CHP’s investigation is ongoing and it asks anyone with information about what happened to call 268-2000 or email humboldt_area.humboldt_area@chp.ca.gov. See the full press release here.…

The Real Thing: Poets in Orleans (Video)

As we listened to the three poets spin their webs last weekend in Orleans, it was easy to fall into a trance. I glanced around at the 50 people who filled the room at the Mid Klamath Watershed Council, arranged in its community events incarnation. The poets had all of us hypnotized. The three of them — Jerry Martien from Lost River, Shaunna McCovey from downriver along the Klamath and Brian Tripp from Orleans — were all veterans at the craft of spellbind. Some part of me strayed back to the teachers who tried to teach us poetry when I was in high school. This was a long time ago, before the invention of computers, even before the advent of ballpoint pens. Those classes made poetry, even the good stuff, hard to swallow. What changed me was a working-class bar in Santa Cruz in the mid-1970s. The crowd there was an unlikely mix of Viet Nam vets and farmworkers, bikers and students deserting their homework. It was not an effete milieu. But one at a time someone would get up from their circle of friends…

KEKA Pulls Out of Truckers Parade, Asks Others to Step Up

KEKA has announced the radio station will no longer present the annual Truckers Christmas Parade and is encouraging another business or community organization to take up the mantle. A release states that issues, including rising costs, declining participation and increased liability, led to the “difficult decision.” “While our family has put on the parade for decades, it’s become apparent that the additional challenges which have had to be met in the past few years have made this event too overwhelming for us to continue putting on,” KEKA owner Brian Papstein says in the release, which also gives a nod of appreciation to Dale Bridge, who has coordinated the parade for decades. Read the KEKA release below: After 30 years of presenting the annual KEKA Truckers Christmas Parade, the station has made the determination not to present the event. This decision was not made in haste, but has been considered for the past few years. Rising costs, declining community participation and increasing liability associated with actions over the parade have led to this difficult decision. Station owner Brian Papstein commented that “While our family has put…

The (French) Women’s Revolution

A herstorical perspective at Redwood Curtain Theatre The Revolutionists takes a fresh look at the French Revolution through the experiences of four women, three real and one composite. Two are familiar: Queen Marie Antoinette (Kaitlyn Samuel Rosin) and Charlotte Corday (Holly Portman). But chances are you’ve never heard of playwright Olympe de Gouges (Alexandra Blouin) or activist Marianne Angelle (Lakia Solomon), who was constructed from multiple fragmented sources because no complete records of black women activists from the colonies could be found. Set in Paris in 1793, The Revolutionists revisits familiar territory for playwright Lauren Gunderson, whose Emilie: La Marquise du Châtelet Defends Her Life Tonight focused on a French woman whose important discoveries were overshadowed by her relationship with a famous man. At the center of this story is Olympe de Gouges, who has tasked herself with writing a play that delivers the voice of the French Revolution. Her Haitian activist friend Marianne Angelle is in desperate need of tracts, pamphlets — anything to help promote her cause — after all, it was more than a little ironic that the French were fighting for…

‘A Mirror of America’

Editor: It has occurred to me that, love him or loathe him, Trump is a mirror of America (Mailbox, Sept. 5). Ask any country to describe American tourists and what you hear is not endearing or attractive. Overweight, obnoxious, loud, insulting, bargain-hunting, insolent litterers who asked aloud why the waiters in Germany don’t “talk normal.” I’m sorry to admit this, but Trump is who we have turned into. It is no surprise to Europe that America has elected, if even losing the popular vote, this low-class, insecure leader when we have been the most advanced and wealthy country in the world. Trump, unfortunately, is the 21st century American commercial. He knows little about the cultures of other countries nor does he care. He gets all his information from TV and rarely picks up a book or even knows the name of a good author. He loves to play the victim, when in actuality he is the leader of a strong American country. He makes himself feel better by putting others down and will lie and scheme to get money, power and, most of all, attention.…

‘Impeach This Monster’

Editor: The Mueller report clearly documented at least 10 instances of obstruction of justice by Trump, yet some of his supporters still try to downplay the obvious criminal behavior of this president (Mailbox, Sept. 5). It is amazing how people still support a president who lies every single time he opens his mouth (more than 13,000, at a recent count). He is a pathological liar, a con man and is only interested in enriching himself. He has a long history of failed business dealings including stiffing workers for pay and five bankruptcies. Besides his racist behavior and attacks on women, how can people who call themselves Christian justify the lack of moral principles he shows every single day? Our government is operating on a shoestring by wholly unqualified people and scientists are being fired and silenced as we see more environmental destruction being approved for the greedy fossil fuel industry to help themselves. Refugees are being locked in concentration camps, causing massive trauma and death. This is a dark stain on our country that will forever be a shameful part of our history. We must…

Don’t Displace Us

Editor: Really, Lost Coast? You want to be found? “Your city. Your voice. This matters.” That’s on a 5-by-8 card I found in my mailbox addressed to Postal Customer Eureka, CA 95502. The card announces that, “The city of Eureka has partnered with Eddy Alexander, a marketing and growth consulting firm, to develop a strategic community brand and tourism marketing program. Your input will help us understand the community’s shared vision and values.” (‘A Comedy of Errors,’ June 6.) My input is that we don’t need/want such a program. We can see tourists in Old Town any day. They come because the Lost Coast hasn’t been found yet. Eureka sells itself on its own. And at a pace that doesn’t displace those of us who live here. Who is the city of Eureka that wants to become a brand sold by Eddie Alexander? And what’s this going to cost? Take that money and invest it in what is already going on here: music and dancing at Madaket Plaza, bands playing all over Old Town, the weekly farmers market, movies in the park, city walls and electric…

North Coast Night Lights: Beauty on the Redwood Highway

I hope my images stoke appreciation for the beauty and wonders around us here on the North Coast of California. Many people never experience so uniquely beautiful a countryside as ours, and too many who live within them forget the treasure they have. They are the unlucky ones. Perhaps my images and stories will help to enlighten those who have never seen the wonders all around us, and reacquaint those who might have forgotten and gotten absorbed in the race and lost their place in the mundane. To be grateful for where one lives is a blessing too easily lost. I know what it is to drive for an hour through the snarl, crawling along too slowly, too crowded between too many terrible drivers, a smog-belched yellow haze in the air you breathe — you drive and you drive, and how far do you get? Not very. (“Damn, this traffic jam!”)* Here on the North Coast one could spend that same hour driving through places like this stretch along the Redwood Corridor… and for an hour of beauty you’re transported 65 miles away (for some…

What’s Most Important?

Editor: I’ve learned here on the North Coast through personal experience that, when it comes to letters to the editor, you can’t know that what you’re reading is what was written. Enough can be edited out by the paper as to have the letter end up saying something completely different than what was intended. Also, I don’t know for sure letter writers are given the chance to name their letters or if that is the papers’ decision. I say all of this to say in Mr. Parrs’ letter to the editor in the Aug. 29 issue of the NCJ, the heading given to it was “Do These People Not Matter.” A heading that would have a reader presume that the victims of drug war and gang violence in the inner cities were the primary point of his letter. I’m not saying he is not concerned about the victims and what their families must go through, I have no reason to doubt what he says in the last two paragraphs of his letter. But it seems when he states very straightforwardly, “… then, and only then will…

We’ve Come to Prefer They/Them Pronouns

Now and then, the Associated Press, which dictates the grammar and style for most American newspapers, sends us updates on its rules and guidelines. Mostly we follow them. AP Style is why we’re stingy with commas, spell “ax” without an e and abbreviate the words street, avenue and boulevard when used with an exact address. It’s a system designed to ensure consistency in the language used in newspaper stories, intended to make it easier for readers, who over time become habituated to seeing information presented in a certain way. It’s also the kind of insider baseball stuff the average reader couldn’t care less about. But some rules are worth breaking and there comes a point when consistency stands in the way of progress, which is the case with the current guidelines for pronouns. A couple years ago, AP Style changed its pronoun policy to allow non-binary people to be referred to by the pronouns they and them. But even in carrying out this exception for the non-binary among us, AP warned that “rewording (the sentence to avoid use of a pronoun) usually is possible and…

The Sucker’s Club

It Chapter Two sinks Review IT CHAPTER TWO. When I realized I would have to wait two years between It and It Chapter Two, I was disappointed. The first movie, released in 2017, was tone-perfect in how it portrayed the first half of Stephen King’s lengthy novel about childhood friends battling a supernatural clown for the soul of their small Maine village, even if it took some liberties with the book’s plot. I wondered if waiting until 2019 to reunite with the Losers Club would dilute some of my enthusiasm. It did not but I now realize that the disappointment I felt at the wait was instructive in preparing for this dismal sequel. If you’re a reader of King’s, you know that the most horrifying parts of his work often aren’t the haunted cell phones or homicidal cars, but the human cruelty that pads the pages between rattles, groans and screams. In this vein, the movie starts with a daisy chain of trauma: a hate crime, domestic violence and suicide that, while all true to the book, do little to move the plot forward, leave…

Eureka, County Are Parties in Opioid Settlement Agreement

Eureka and Humboldt County are parties to the tentative multi-billion-dollar settlement reached this week in a landmark lawsuit brought by thousands of municipal governments and more than two dozen states against Purdue Pharma, the company that created OxyContin. The settlement — which still needs to be ratified by plaintiffs and approved by the judge — reportedly involves Purdue Pharma filing for bankruptcy protection, dissolving and emerging as a new company, the profits of which would be distributed among plaintiffs in the case. The deal also would reportedly see Purdue Pharma’s owners, the Sackler family, pay out $3 billion in cash over seven years but includes no admission of wrongdoing. According to NBC News, the entire settlement is valued at $10 billion to $12 billion. Eureka City Attorney Bob Black said the city is still awaiting details on the particulars of the settlement and how funds would be distributed, noting that the agreement will need to be approved by at least 75 percent of plaintiffs in the case to take effect. That may prove a high bar, as some parties have already publicly criticized the settlement…

‘Do the Right Thing’

Editor: Our community has lost an important resource and friend. The KHSU we are getting now is not the KHSU we as a community grew, supported and loved for more than 50 years (Mailbox, Aug. 22). We as a community volunteered countless hours developing and maintaining quality community based radio. KHSU was a uniquely wonderful hybrid radio station. It was a wonderful mix of locally produced public affairs and music programs with syndicated national and world news and information programing. It was a radio station that provided so much for us as a community, joining us together and keeping us informed. It was a community radio station built in partnership by HSU and the community. Staff, volunteers and student interns all worked together building a much needed bridge between the university and the community. It was truly part of our community, it was where many of us turned when we needed information or we had information to share. It was where we found out about many local events, fundraisers, needs and gifts. It was a bridge to connect with the place we call home and…

Welcome to NCJ Burger Week!

Join us in this week-long celebration of the glorious creation known as “the hamburger.” This year, 30 restaurants are participating in the revelry, using everything from duck and lamb to beets and quinoa to offer up mind boggling creations. And the bacon. So much beloved bacon. Thirty burgers in nine days. Can you try them all? We think you can. Godspeed. See ALL the burgers at NCJBurgerweek.com NCJ Burger Week Pro Tips The deals are dine-in only. No take-out. Sorry. You need to get out of the house and eat in a restaurant like a person anyway. Sometimes restaurants run out of burgers. Good news: #NCJBurgerWeek will be even meatier than last year’s inaugural event! That also means more fellow diners showing up and, because kitchens aren’t staffed with genies and supplies are not infinite, a given restaurant could run out of its #NCJBurgerWeek burger toward the end of a shift. If that happens, know that we feel your pain and it’s going to be OK. There’s always tomorrow, when you can come back and order the burger we all want you to have. Don’t…

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!