San Diego

Trump, Lopez Obrador visit is about trade, but politics too

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump, who has denigrated Mexican migrants and threatened the U.S. ally with crippling tariffs, welcomed President Andrés Manuel López Obrador to the White House on Wednesday with lofty language and he called America’s southern neighbor a cherished partner. Trump said the countries’ economic and security relationship was reaching new heights. Trump’s affectionate words were in stark contrast to the days when he called Mexicans “rapists” and railed against migrants entering the United States illegally. Lopez Obrador had cordial words for Trump, too, saying that while the two leaders have disagreed, it was better to find common ground and avoid slinging insults. “Instead of remembering the insults, things like that, against me, we have received from you President Trump an understanding and respect,” Lopez Obrador said. “Some people thought ideological difference differences would inevitably lead to confrontations.” Back home, Lopez Obrador has received criticism for making this his first foreign trip as president, just four months before the election. With no meetings planned with former Vice President Joe Biden, Lopez Obrador seemingly is banking that Trump will win a second term.…

Americans face testing delays as virus surges

LOS ANGELES (AP) — For two weeks, Rachael Jones has stayed home, going without a paycheck while waiting and waiting for the results of a COVID-19 test from a pharmacy near Philadelphia. “I’m just so disappointed. I just don’t know how — with the resources and the people we have and the money we have — we can’t get this right,” she said. Four months, 3 million confirmed infections and over 130,000 deaths into the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S., Americans confronted with a resurgence of the scourge are facing long lines at testing sites in the summer heat or are getting turned away. Others are going a week or more without receiving a diagnosis. Some sites are running out of kits, while labs are reporting shortages of materials and workers to process the swabs. Some frustrated Americans are left to wonder why the U.S. can’t seem to get its act together, especially after it was given fair warning as the virus wreaked havoc in China and then Italy, Spain and New York. “It’s a hot mess,” said 47-year-old Jennifer Hudson of Tucson, Arizona. “The…

Death row inmate dies of apparent virus complications

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Another California death row inmate at San Quentin State Prison has died from apparent complications of the coronavirus in the midst of an outbreak that has infected about 40% of inmates at the prison, corrections officials said Wednesday. David Reed, 60, died Tuesday at an outside hospital, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said in a statement. He is the sixth death row inmate to die of COVID-related complications at the prison north of San Francisco. Reed was sent to death row 2011 in the racially motivated murder of Ricky Mosley in Palm Springs. Reed, who was white, fatally stabbed Mosley, who was Black, near a restaurant in March 2004. In a recorded interview, Reed discussed the killing with detectives and used a racial epithet to describe Mosley, who was a transient. Prosecutors said Reed staked out the area two weeks for Mosley to come around the restaurant and then attacked him because he believed Mosley had sexually assaulted his estranged wife. Mosley was found stabbed through the heart. Nearly 1,400 of the 3,500 inmates at San Quentin have tested…

Back stregnthening and stretching workout with Cindy Whitmarsh

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Good Morning San Diego fitness expert, Cindy Whitmarsh, demonstrated a back strengthening and stretching workout. Whitmarsh said make sure to do an active warm-up for at least five minutes before performing this work out. 1. Dumbbell reverse fly2. Dumbbell row series3. Opposite arm leg reach4. Superman lift 5. Forward fold and swing6. Cat cow downward dog7. Saddle pose reach back8. Child’s pose lateral reaches Repeat each exercise 20 to 30 reps, 2 or 3 times. Categories: Fitness with Cindy Whitmarsh, Good Morning San Diego, In Studio Guests

New order gives restaurants the ability to create sidewalk cafes without a permit

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer signed an emergency executive order on Tuesday waiving permits and other regulatory requirements to allow restaurants to expand their services onto outdoor dining spaces like sidewalks and private parking lots. The San Diego City Council is expected to consider a proposed ordinance next week that will expand on Faulconer’s order. If approved, the ordinance will reduce permit fees, waive and streamline permit reviews, allow for outdoor dining plazas and outdoor operations in on-street parking areas, Faulconer said. Mayor Faulconer joined Good Morning San Diego to discuss the new order and how it will help struggling businesses. The decision to nix indoor operations at restaurants, bars and breweries is in line with restrictions imposed last week by Gov. Gavin Newsom on counties on the state’s coronavirus monitoring list, which now includes 23 counties. San Diego County was added to that list Friday, primarily due to the region’s rising rate of cases per 100,000 residents. San Diego County reported 129.3 cases per 100,000 on Monday, well above the state’s metric of 100 per 100,000. Categories: Coronavirus, Good Morning…

Author of ‘Unreported Truths about COVID-19 and Lockdowns’ questions our pandemic response

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – As the coronavirus pandemic continues and confirmed cases pass 3 million in the United States, more data has become available to analyze. After analyzing the data, author and former New York Times reporter Alex Berenson, continues to question the United States response to the coronavirus pandemic. His new book, “Unreported Truths about COVID-19 and Lockdowns” was temporarily banned from Amazon. He believes it is because the book is very critical of how we have responded to the disease that is not as deadly as was originally thought. In his book, Berenson explains early Chinese data suggested the virus might have an “infection fatality rate” as high as 1.4 – 2%. A death rate in that range could mean the coronavirus might kill more than 6 million Americans, although even under the worst-case scenarios some people would not be exposed, and others might have natural immunity that would prevent them from being infected at all. As we have learned more about the virus, estimates of its lethality have fallen. Calculating fatality rates is complex, because despite all of our testing for COVID,…

Dr. Scott Atlas pushes for reopening and asks, ‘aren’t schools an essential business?’

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Dr. Scott Atlas from the Hoover Institute has been a critic of the fear mongering tactics health officials have been using when it comes to reporting data from the coronavirus pandemic. Pushing back against a recent model from the University of Washington’s Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation that projects over 134,000 Americans will die of COVID-19 by August 4th, Dr. Scott Atlas explained, “we should look at the evidence. We don’t need to rely on hypothetical projections.” Dr. Atlas has explained many times on KUSI News that the rising case numbers aren’t something to freak out about. Instead, Dr. Atlas looked at the data to find the large majority of new cases are occurring in young people, and young people are at low risk of experiencing any major complications of the virus. Using this fact as evidence, Dr. Atlas is calling for schools to reopen, since young people have so little to worry about in regard to the coronavirus. “We know it’s factually true and proven all over the world that people under 18 have very little, if any, risk…

Harvard, MIT sue to block ICE rule on international students

BOSTON (AP) — Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday challenging the Trump administration’s decision to bar international students from staying in the U.S. if they take classes entirely online this fall. The lawsuit, filed in Boston’s federal court, seeks to prevent federal immigration authorities from enforcing the rule. The universities contend that the directive violates the Administrative Procedures Act because officials failed to offer a reasonable basis justifying the policy and because the public was not given notice to comment on it. The Trump administration did not immediately respond to requests for comment. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement notified colleges Monday that international students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools operate entirely online this fall. New visas will not be issued to students at those schools, and others at universities offering a mix of online and in-person classes will be barred from taking all of their classes online. The guidance says international students won’t be exempt even if an outbreak forces their schools online during the fall term. The…

Supreme Court sides with Administration in birth control opt-out case

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is siding with the Trump administration in its effort to allow more employers to opt out of providing no-cost birth control to women as required by the Affordable Care Act. The high court on Wednesday said 7-2 the administration acted properly when it allowed more employers who cite a religious or moral objection to opt out of covering birth control. “We hold today that the Departments had the statutory authority to craft that exemption, as well as the contemporaneously issued moral exemption. We further hold that the rules promulgating these exemptions are free from procedural defects,” Justice Clarence Thomas wrote. As a result of the Obama-era health law most employers must cover birth control as a preventive service, at no charge to women, in their insurance plans. Categories: Health, National & International News, Politics

San Diego County health officials report COVID-19 deaths near 400

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – San Diego County health officials reported a new one- day high of positive COVID-19 cases as indoor operations have been halted in various businesses throughout the region. There were 578 COVID-19 cases and 12 deaths reported Tuesday, raising the region’s totals to 17,578 cases and 399 fatalities. Of 5,530 tests reported Tuesday, 10% were positive. The 14-day rolling average of positive tests is now at 5.9%. Of the 12 deaths, five men and seven women died. They ranged in age from the late 40s to early 90s and all but one had underlying health conditions. Additionally, five new community-based outbreaks were reported Tuesday — in a restaurant, two bars, a grocery store and another business. The number of community outbreaks over the last week is now at 22, well over the county metric of seven outbreaks in seven days. A community outbreak is defined as three or more COVID-19 cases in a setting from different households. More than 75% of the community outbreaks have been traced to restaurants and bars. As of Tuesday, cases requiring hospitalization totaled 1,923 or 10.9% of…

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