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Mickey Gilley, Como la Flor are coming to the Ramona Bowl

The audience swayed and clapped to the sounds of Motown with the Legends Thursday night at the Ramona Bowl, but the fun has just begun as two more top line performances are scheduled this summer at the historic Bowl. Como la Flor, a heartwarming tribute to Tejano music star Selena, performs July 27, and the top of the country music scene, Mickey Gilley, will perform Sept. 2.
Tickets for these two great performances are going quickly, and the Ramona Bowl staff urges Valley residents make their reservations soon.
Como la Flor, the longest touring Selena tribute band in the nation, will sing some of Selena’s favorite songs like “Bidi Bidi Bom Bom” and of course, “Como la Flor” in the acoustically perfect Ramona Bowl Amphitheater. Singer, model and dancer Karol Posada provides vocals that are so near to her idol Selena’s voice. If one closes their eyes, they may seem to hear Selena onstage once more.
Backing her up is the Como la Flor band with the acclaimed Juan Carlos Salazar on keyboard and accordion, Eddie Bevins on timbale, Doug Brunelle on bass, Giovanni Anarbo Solorio on congas, Jonathon Chap on drums and Cesar Dias on background vocals.
The band coming straight out the “House of Blues” and other major entertainment centers from their recent tours will feel right at home in the lovely Ramona Bowl grounds surrounded by flowers and the famous Rancho Moreno hacienda from the “Ramona” play.
Whether in Spanish or English, the Tejano “musica” of the beautiful Selena, long remembered in America, Mexico, Latin America and South America will come alive, Thursday, July 27.
Tickets for their performance are only $10 and may be purchased on Etix, other online entertainment outlets or the Ramona Bowl box office, 27400 Ramona Bowl Road in Hemet.
With a change of mood, the next scheduled performer at the Ramona Bowl Amphitheater with a rare appearance is beloved country music star and “Urban Cowboy” Mickey Gilley, Sept. 2 during the Labor Day holiday. The special show will bring Gilley and his band to the Ramona Bowl to the delight of many local and regional fans.
Gilley, grew up with his cousins, Jerry Lee Lewis and Jimmy Swaggart, and learned the best of boogie-woogie and gospel songs that later turned into what is called rockabilly.
After breaking away from Lewis who hit the top of the charts in the 1950s, Gilley began seeing his own music starting to rise in the late 1960s after releasing his first album, “Down the Line,” with the hit song “Now I can Live Again.” Some of the songs that brought him to his notoriety as the “Urban Cowboy” will most likely be performed at the Ramona Bowl Amphitheater Sept. 2.
Gilley owned his own Gilley’s Club in Pasadena, Texas, and it soon became known as the “world’s biggest honky-tonk.” The club became the setting for the “Urban Cowboy.” Soon he was propelled into true stardom with some No. 1 cover versions of older country music, like “Room Full of Roses,” “City Lights,” “Talk to Me” and the unforgettable “You Really Got a Hold on Me.”
Audiences at the Ramona Bowl will delight in hearing many of his 17 No. 1 hits. He was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1984.
The very personable 81-year-old Mickey Gilley may describe his miraculous recovery from a life-threatening fall in 2010, while helping a friend move a piece of furniture in Branson, Missouri. The accident left him partially paralyzed, taking him out of the music scene for some time. That he is back performing is a delight to family and fans alike.
Tickets cost $35 to $50, depending on seating arrangements. Tickets may be purchased online at www.etix.com and at the Ramona Bowl box office in Hemet.
Information about Ramona Bowl performances and other events may be found at http://www.box-officetickets.com/box-officetickets-customer-service  or by calling (844) 882-1114.
The post Mickey Gilley, Como la Flor are coming to the Ramona Bowl appeared first on Valley News .

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