California Dolphin: statewide California news

Group attempts to set world record at Lake Elsinore with blimp, water ski

Doug Sherman is pulled behind a T-Moblie blimp as he tries to break the world record for blimp skiing, nine kilometers at Lake Elsinore Monday. March 12, 2018 Doug Sherman gets into a pontoon boat before attempting to break the world record for blimp skiing, nine kilometers at Lake Elsinore Monday. March 12, 2018 Doug Sherman is pulled behind a T-Moblie blimp as he tries to break the world record for blimp skiing, nine kilometers at Lake Elsinore Monday. March 12, 2018 Show Caption of Expand
What do you get when you mix a blimp with some water skiers and a quick-draw texter?
Possibly a few mentions in an upcoming edition of Guinness World Records.
For more than an hour Monday, March 12, a 140-foot-long gray blimp with a giant magenta T-Mobile banner floated a few hundred feet above Lake Elsinore.
The blimp was there to pick up a water skier from the middle of the lake. Despite windy waters, the skier, Doug Sherman, was able to grab a long rope from the dirigible and begin skiing in an attempt to set a new world record for longest-distance blimp skiing.
Because of the choppy waters, he didn’t quite make it, traveling about 3 miles. To set the record, he needed to go about five miles.
The companies behind the effort, which include T-Mobile and AirSign, an aerial advertising company, attempted to set multiple world records: longest distance water skiing behind an airship or blimp, the largest number of people skiing under a blimp and fastest text sent from someone skiing behind a blimp.
T-Mobile organized the event to promote the Samsung Galaxy S9, a phone that will be available for its customers later this week. The goal was to ski nine kilometers and get up to nine people skiing behind the blimp, organizers said.
Martin McBride, communications manager for T-Mobile, rode on one of the boats as the world records were attempted.
“This is one of the most audacious things we’ve done in a while,” he said.
Philip Robertson, an adjudicator with Guinness World Records, also rode on a boat to verify each record attempt.
In order to set a record for the longest ski behind a blimp, the skier would need to travel more than five miles, Robertson said.
In order to set a record for the fastest text, someone needed to send, “The razor-toothed piranhas of the genera Serrasalmus and Pygocentrus are the most ferocious freshwater fish in the world. In reality they seldom attack a human,” within 45 seconds, Robertson said. Nine people would need to ski simultaneously to set the final record.
McBride, of T-Mobile, said the company chose Lake Elsinore because of the weather and ease of working with the city.
Lake Elsinore was paid $200 to close the lake and roughly $3,300 for law enforcement to be at the event, senior management analyst Nicole Dailey said. A film and special-event permit were also required.
T-Mobile partnered with AirSign to obtain the blimp for the world record attempt.
McBride said T-Mobile plans on promoting the event on social media later this week.

Top News

Ain't No God; don't even think about theism

UnFox News: not a propaganda arm of the Republican party