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Students’ mental health films win regional awards

Films created by students from Murrieta Valley High School, Encore High School and Temecula Valley High School are among the winners for Region 2 in the sixth annual Directing Change Program & Film Contest . The contest challenges young people to start conversations in their community by creating 60-second films about suicide prevention and mental health.
“Distant Memories,” a film created by Jacob Thiel, Kyle Reid and Luke Van Ryzin of Murrieta Valley High School, won first place in the high school Suicide Prevention category for Region 2 and advances to the statewide round of judging.
Another film from Murrieta Valley High School, “Know your worth,” took second place in the Suicide Prevention category for Region 2. Filmmaker is Mariel Sto. Domingo. Ella Harrison is adviser for the Murrieta Valley High School student filmmakers.
Winning first place in the high school Mental Health Matters category for Region 2 is “Scribbled,” a film created by five students at Encore High School, advised by Jared Nelson. This film also advances to the statewide competition.
“Behind the Mask,” a film created by Temecula Valley High School student David Tinaz, took third place in the high school Mental Health Matters category for Region 2. Adviser is Kim Randall.
To view these films and the other regional winners, go to www.directingchangeca.org/films/
The contest is sponsored by Each Mind Matters: California’s Mental Health Movement and the California Mental Health Services Authority. Statewide winners will be announced at an awards ceremony Tuesday, May 22, at the Theater at Ace Hotel in Los Angeles.
Sign up for The Localist, our daily email newsletter with handpicked stories relevant to where you live. Subscribe here .
Sign up for The Localist, our daily email newsletter with handpicked stories relevant to where you live. Subscribe here.This year the program received 742 submissions from 164 schools and community-based organizations, representing 32 California counties and 2,430 youth and young adults.
Submissions were judged by volunteer experts in mental health and suicide prevention, members of the media and professionals in film making and video production. The films were judged based on how the entries creatively explored the topics while also adhering to guidelines about how to safely and appropriately communicate about suicide prevention and mental illness.

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