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Crow Tests Positive for West Nile Virus


The Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services reports that a crow has tested positive for West Nile Virus and that local humans should take precautions to avoid  the disease. West Nile Virus is spread by mosquito bites and in humans the symptoms can range from none to severe illness and even death. DHHS encourages people to prevent mosquito bites using bug spray and long sleeves, and to seek treatment after a bite if they experience symptoms that include a high fever, muscle stiffness or disorientation. A full list of symptoms and more information can be found at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's website by clicking here . DHHS also asks Humboldt residents to report dead squirrels and birds at the California West Nile Virus Surveillance Program hotline: (877) 968-2473. Mosquitoes feeding on animals infected with the disease can go on to transfer it to humans. Last year Humboldt County saw its first West Nile case in four years , although health officials believed that risk to locals was benign because the patient contracted the virus while traveling abroad. The virus has made an appearance this year, according to Melissa Martel, director of the Department of Health and Human Services’ Division of Environmental Health. “It takes several weeks of warm temperatures for the virus to intensify and several cycles of disease transmission for the virus to cause illness,” Martel says in the press release. From the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services: An American Crow in Humboldt County has tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV). This is the first WNV-positive bird reported in the county this year. Statewide, a total of 15 birds have tested positive for WNV already this year, according to the California Department of Public Health. No human cases have been reported. “It’s early in the season to be seeing positive birds,” said Melissa Martel, Director of the Department of Health & Human Services’ Division of Environmental Health. “It takes several weeks of warm temperatures for the virus to intensify and several cycles of disease transmission for the virus to cause illness.” According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), most people get infected with WNV after being bitten by an infected mosquito. Mosquitos become infected when they feed on infected birds and can…

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