Upland spends nearly 70% of coronavirus relief money on salaries and overtime

Upland will spend nearly 70% of state coronavirus funding on city employee salaries, overtime pay, benefits and family leave, according to the city manager’s report. The expenditures began accruing in March — stay-at-home orders were issued by the state at that time, crippling the economy, driving up unemployment and shuttering schools — and will extend into November. These were approved by the Upland City Council Monday, Aug. 10, on a 4-0 vote without discussion. About $720,570 — a little more than 68% — will go to regular and overtime pay for public safety employees, including police and fire, as well as those doing extra cleaning to disinfect surfaces at City Hall and other city facilities, the report said. This includes $452,200 in salary and benefits and $268,370 for allowable staff time taken to care for a child whose school and/or child care provider was shut down. Other expenditures in Upland from the $500 million allocated by the state Legislature to cities as part of the state Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act include: $160,000 for protective gear and supplies; $100,000 toward small business…

LAUSD Board Approves Labor Agreement With Teachers On Distance Learning

Share this article:The Los Angeles Unified School District board Tuesday unanimously approved an labor agreement with its teachers union outlining procedures for continued distance-learning during the upcoming school year as campuses remain closed due to the coronavirus pandemic. The agreement still needs formal approval of United Teachers Los Angeles members. If it receives that approval, the pact will remain in effect through Dec. 31 or until students are back on campuses for regular instruction. LAUSD Board of Education members conceded the distance-learning plans aren’t perfect, but they marked an improvement over the online learning that was implemented on the fly in March when the pandemic erupted. Board member George McKenna said he has “no illusions the students will be as well-served … with distance learning as they would be if they could actually be in a classroom with a teacher.” He added, “All we can do is try to keep our children safe and as well-educated as we can.” The LAUSD school year will begin next week, with students attending primarily orientation sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday, and the first day of actual instruction on…

Feds Arrest Owner of LA Investment Firm That Managed Over $1B in Assets

Share this article:The founder and former CEO of an investment firm that specializes in debt instruments was arrested Tuesday on federal charges alleging he falsified financial records to fraudulently inflate the value of the funds he managed, allowing him to charge investors millions of dollars in unauthorized fees. Brendan Ross, 47, of La Canada Flintridge, who founded Direct Lending Investments in 2012, was taken into custody by special agents of the FBI, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. He pleaded not guilty during an arraignment hearing Tuesday and released on a $2 million bond. An Aug. 24 status conference was set. In conjunction with the unsealing of the criminal case, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filed a civil complaint against Ross, alleging he defrauded investors. The arrest stems from a grand jury indictment handed down July 30 that charges Ross with 10 counts of wire fraud based on a scheme he allegedly executed between late 2013 and early 2019 to defraud investors in funds managed by DLI, a firm he still owns. Each of the 10 wire fraud counts carries a sentence of up…

Red Bluff Joint Union High School trustees receive final update before school begins

RED BLUFF — The Red Bluff Joint Union High School District Board of Trustees received a final update Tuesday from Superintendent Todd Brose before school starts Thursday at Red Bluff High School. Brose said teachers and substitute teachers have been training to learn the school’s new coronavirus protocols and measures. Substitute teachers are required to go through the training before being allowed to teach. All teachers were given a thermometer, screening papers, gloves and disinfectant. Principal Rich Hassay planned to hand out schedules to the teachers Tuesday, Brose said. Those schedules were intended to be sent to parents later that night or by Wednesday. “As soon as the kids know where they are going, that will be good,” said Board President Kathy Brandt. There will be two lunch periods to reduce student contact. Brose said 315 students have signed up for distance learning. Those students will still receive breakfast, lunch and supper. The school will host a drive-through 9-10 a.m. for students to pick up their the meals. Students with disabilities who attend school in person will still receive the resources they need, Brose said.…

Pickup crashes through wall at FoodMaxx in Red Bluff

RED BLUFF — No one was injured Tuesday morning when a woman crashed a pickup through an outside wall at FoodMaxx at the Belle Mill Shopping Center. There were no injuries in a crash about 9 a.m. Tuesday at FoodMaxx. (Julie Zeeb — Daily News) Police responded to the incident about 9 a.m. Tuesday and learned the driver, whose name was not released, had mistaken the gas pedal for the brake pedal and the white Dodge pickup collided with the building, bursting through into the men’s bathroom, said Sgt. Kevin Busekist. “Had anyone been standing inside (the restroom) it would have resulted in serious injury or a fatality,” Busekist said. “Fortunately, no one was in there and there were no injuries, but it did considerable damage to the bathroom, including a water leak.” The woman, a 69-year-old Red Bluff resident, was not hurt, Busekist said. The damage to the men’s restroom extended into the women’s restroom. One of a few employees assisting in assessing damage and cleaning up the area said he was outside of the building on a break when the crash occurred. After…

Outdoor events return to Tehama District Fairground

RED  BLUFF — The Tehama District Fairground has been approved for holding outdoor equestrian events with modifications, according to a press release issued recently. Talks for reopening plans began June 2, when the fair board approved three June equestrian events to be held if clearance was given from Tehama County Public Health Officer Dr. Richard Wickenheiser. Fair CEO Mandy Staley said a reopening plan was submitted in May that was approved once the sector the fairground falls under was cleared. A rider participates in a rodeo event in 2017 at the Tehama District Fairground. ( DN file) A press release on the fairground website Aug. 5 stated, “With the help of California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA), Tehama County Department of Public Health, Dr. Wickenheiser, and Val Lucero the fairgrounds has been approved to hold events with a modified plan. Similar to restaurants being able to open for modified outdoor dining, the fairgrounds have been approved for outdoor events with additional safety measures in place. To protect the health of our community, contestants, staff and volunteers the fairgrounds has adopted new measures to ensure…

Despite ICE order, students likely to be deported

The Student and Exchange Visitor Program, a Department of Homeland Security unit that oversees non-immigrant students, recently announced that higher education students taking mostly online classes may not be allowed to remain in the United States. In its bulletin that affects F-1 and M-1 visa holders, Immigration and Customs Enforcement made clear that students attending schools operating fully online or in hybrid instruction mode may not remain in the U.S. Prospective students whose chosen universities offer online-only education will not be allowed to enter. Students currently enrolled in such programs must either transfer to schools that offer in-person learning, leave the country voluntarily or risk deportation. ICE created understandable anxiety across U.S. universities. But its announcement isn’t a new immigration twist; rather the order represents compliance with existing immigration law which strictly limits the number of online classes an international student may take. For years, F-1 foreign students – more than 1 million are enrolled today – have arrived in the U.S., earned their degrees and returned home. The visa’s original intent is exactly that – students study here, go home and use their U.S-acquired…

The longer we’re isolated, the less productive we get

COVID-19 is getting old – particularly for employees who’ve been working from home for months. That’s the finding of a Wall Street Journal article, “Companies Start to Think Remote Work Isn’t So Great After All.” Early on, when millions stopped commuting and started working from home, many companies saw good results. Work was getting done. Most employees enjoyed it. Companies saw an opportunity to reduce future office overhead costs by making remote work part of their long-term strategy. But that was before cracks began to emerge in the work-from-home model. According to The Journal, initiatives now take longer. Hiring and integrating new staff is harder. Employees aren’t bonding or growing with each other. Efforts to collaborate online are going flat. One CEO puts his finger on the problem: It’s “vital to have individuals in a room and see physique language and skim indicators that don’t come by means of a display screen.” He’s exactly correct. Humans are social animals. We’re at our best when we collaborate face to face. Communication theorist Nick Morgan explains why in Forbes: “(W)e share mirror neurons that allow us to…

A look at the last 11 days of World War II: Aug. 12, 1945

Editor’s note: Part of a series detailing the information local newspaper readers received during the last 11 days of World War II about the events home and abroad during those pivotal days 75 years ago. The War The allies responded to Japan’s tentative surrender message saying that Emperor Hirohito could remain on the throne as requested, but he must take orders from the occupying armies. The U.S. said it would be up to the Japanese people if Hirohito remained in charge. Meanwhile, 500 American bombers resumed attacks on mainland Japan. There had been a hiatus of bombing after the Japanese tentative surrender message was received a day earlier. Aug. 4, 1945 | Aug. 5, 1945 | Aug. 6, 1945 | Aug. 7, 1945 | Aug. 8, 1945 | Aug. 9, 1945 Back home Federal authorities passed along some other good news — production of nylon hose for civilians will be one of the first products available when hosiery mills reopen for civilian production. The United Press reported “nylon hose will reappear on the market within two months after V-J Day.” Lt. Col. Frank Cumiskey of Colton was awarded…

Riverside County reports 1,393 new coronavirus cases, 4 deaths

Riverside County confirmed 1,393 new cases of the coronavirus and four more deaths Tuesday, Aug. 11. The county also saw its largest one-day increase in testing with 11,036 new tests, though at least part of that number is likely due to the correcting of a backlog in a state database. The county notes on its website that a statewide data collection delay is affecting the number of confirmed cases and tests, positivity rates and the doubling time. Here’s a look at the updated numbers, according to county and state public health officials. Riverside County Cases: 43,376, up from 41,983 Monday, Aug. 10 Deaths: 824, up from 820 Monday Related links Why your traditional Riverside County polling place might not be there Nov. 3 1 Inland restaurant closes due to a coronavirus death; 2 others reopen Pac-12 football shuts down: Coronavirus cancels fall season Map shows coronavirus cases, deaths in Riverside County cities Coronavirus in Riverside County: COVID-19 coverage from the Press-Enterprise Hospitalizations: 358 Monday, down from 359 Sunday, Aug. 9; suspected patients: 92 Monday, down from 95 Sunday Intensive-care unit patients: 112 Monday, same as…

Nordstrom shoppers saddened by loss of Montclair, Riverside stores

Reader Leila Hainline phoned recently to express her disappointment with two matters. First, that Nordstrom had closed its only two Inland Empire stores, in Montclair and Riverside. Second, that the news had not appeared in my column. “We have no other shops like that. And you haven’t written one word,” Hainline chided. “We don’t have another elite-type store. Macy’s doesn’t qualify in our area. That’s my gripe. I’ve been waiting for you to write about it.” I must not have felt elite enough. Nordstrom’s closing was in our newspaper back in May, of course. To my knowledge the stores, which were only doing curbside pickup due to the pandemic, never reopened. With no chance to visit a closeout sale, talk to customers and say goodbye, not to mention score some deals, there seemed to be nothing for me to add. Personally I had only shopped at the Montclair store once or twice. Nordstrom was a bit above my station in life. I mean, a man in a suit played a grand piano to provide background music for shoppers. (That was Brian Shyer; I’ve since met…

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