Inland Empire

Chino’s Food for Life Ministry plans April 4 food distribution

Food for Life Ministry, a food pantry based in Chino, will hold one of its regular food distributions 9 a.m.-noon Saturday, April 4, from its warehouse, 4712 Cheyenne Way, Chino. “These are unprecedented times, but we still have lots of food to give away,” Cindy vande Steeg, a founder and secretary of Food for Life, said in a press release. “We have been taking safety precautions, and we want everyone to know they can come here to get food, especially our regular clients,” vande Steeg said in the press release. The organization also welcomes those who normally get food from Chino Neighborhood House. Food for Life Ministry will continue holding three food distributions a week from its warehouse. Those include distributions 4-6 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. The Saturday, April 18, distribution, originally scheduled at First United Reformed Church in Chino, will be held at the Food for Life warehouse. Those coming to the food distributions must bring a form of identification. Food for Life welcomes volunteers and food donations. For information, go to www.FoodforLifeMinistry.org or call 909-627-3663.

Public Health officer recommends face coverings during essential outings

San Bernardino County health officials are recommending people use face coverings when leaving home to conduct essential business such as grocery shopping, going to a medical appointment or visiting a pharmacy to help flatten the curve of Covid-19.  The County made the recommendation after reviewing guidance released on April 1 from the state Department of Public Health. Face coverings may include coverings that secure to the ears or back of the head and encompass the mouth and nose. Homemade cloth ear loop covers, bandannas and handkerchiefs, and neck gaiters may be used to reduce the spread of Covid-19 particularly among asymptomatic people. Staying home, practicing social distancing and frequent handwashing are far more effective ways to combat the spread of Covid-19, and face coverings are not a substitute for continuing those practices, said Acting County Public Health Officer Dr. Erin Gustafson. “Surgical masks and N95 masks should not be used because they must be preserved for healthcare workers and emergency responders,” Gustafson said. “If you do use a face covering, make sure to practice frequent hand washing before and after touching and adjusting the covering.” Wash cloth…

Riverside and Perris offer pickup meals for seniors during coronavirus crisis

Seniors can pick up seven frozen meals every Friday while staying in their car at the Janet Goeske Center in Riverside and Mead Valley Senior Center in Perris. Each person 60 or older can receive seven meals from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. each Friday until further notice. Those younger than 60 can pick up meals for someone else by presenting a copy of the senior’s ID during the check-in process. Related links Simple DIY mask-making tips to fight against coronavirus How to clean and disinfect your home during the coronavirus pandemic Coronavirus: Californians 70 or older with expiring driver’s licenses to receive 120-day extensions Unraveling a coronavirus mystery: Stomach bug can be sign of infection Walk-ups are accepted for seniors who rely on public transportation, but due to the coronavirus outbreak, proper physical distancing must be maintained at all times and bandanas, scarves, or masks are highly recommended, a news release states. The Janet Goeske Center is at 5257 Sierra St. in Riverside, 951-351-8800. The Mead Valley Senior Center is at 21091 Rider St., Suite 102 in Perris, 951-210-1587. The Janet Goeske Foundation provides…

San Bernardino County recommends covering face in public to avoid spreading coronavirus

San Bernardino County is recommending people cover their faces when they leave the house to avoid spreading the novel coronavirus, public health officials said Thursday, April 2. Face coverings should be worn when doing essential business, such as grocery shopping, going to a medical appointment or visiting a pharmacy, a news release stated. Staying home, practicing social distancing and frequent handwashing are far more effective ways to combat the spread of COVID-19 and face coverings are not a substitute for continuing those practices, Acting County Public Health Officer Dr. Erin Gustafson, said in a statement. “Surgical masks and N95 masks should not be used because they must be preserved for healthcare workers and emergency responders,” Gustafson said. “If you do use a face covering, make sure to practice frequent hand washing before and after touching and adjusting the covering.” The county made the recommendation after reviewing guidance released Wednesday, April 1, from the state Department of Public Health. The recommendation follows one made by Riverside County public health officials Wednesday, April 1. Los Angeles and Orange counties have also advised residents to cover up after…

Coronavirus help: OnwardCA created to help displaced Californians find work

With scores of businesses closing amid the coronavirus pandemic, people throughout California have found themselves out of work and are wondering where to turn. More than 1 million Californians have filed for unemployment benefits over the past two weeks alone. But help is on the way. Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday, April 2 unveiled an online resource designed to get displaced employees back to work. The OnwardCA website onwardca.org connects people with emergency resources and training programs to upskill for a new career. It also will help match users with employers who are looking for people with their current skill set. The platform also connects people to funds and necessities such as groceries, shelter and medicine. COVID-19-related resources on the website include: Statewide COVID-19 Clearinghouse California Department of Public Health California Office of Emergency Services California Gov. Gavin Newsom Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development Users click on a county and a variety of resources are revealed under categories such as Consumers & Businesses, Frequently Asked Questions and Coping With Stress. Collective effort The website was created through a broad coalition of public and…

Amazon worker in San Bernardino tests positive for coronavirus

An employee at an Amazon fulfillment center in San Bernardino has tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, the company confirmed Thursday, April 2. Employees of the facility, at 1910 E. Central Ave., have been informed and anyone who was in close contact with the employee will be asked to self-quarantine for 14 days, an Amazon statement said. Workers at centers in Moreno Valley and Eastvale have also tested positive. “We are supporting the individual who is recovering,” Timothy Carter, Amazon spokesperson, said in an emailed statement. The company is following medical guidelines  and is “taking extreme measures to ensure the safety of employees at our site.” Amazon employees diagnosed with COVID-19 or placed into quarantine will receive up to two weeks of pay, the company said. Related links Amazon worker in Moreno Valley tests positive for coronavirus Amazon fallout: Eastvale worker says company ‘ho-hum’ on coronavirus safety Eastvale Amazon worker tests positive for coronavirus San Bernardino County coronavirus cases grow to 254, no new deaths reported San Bernardino County drive-thru coronavirus testing event open in Victorville Amazon said it has…

Governor announces aid for small businesses, workers displaced by COVID-19

Governor Gavin Newsom unveiled a series of new resources to aid small businesses and help California workers who have lost work due to COVID-19. Beginning tomorrow, California small businesses impacted by the COVID-19 crisis can apply for a loan from the federal government for up to $10 million. Importantly, the program is first-come, first-serve and the Governor encourages all eligible California small businesses to contact their lender to learn more. Today, the Governor also announced that the state is allocating $50 million to the California Infrastructure and Economic Development Bank for loan guarantees to small businesses to help eliminate barriers to capital for individuals who do not qualify for federal funds, including low wealth and undocumented immigrant communities. The state is also allowing small businesses to defer payment of sales and use taxes of up to $50,000, for up to 12 months. Additionally, the Governor joined Bitwise Industries and the Kapor Center to launch OnwardCa.org, a new platform connecting displaced California workers with more than 70,000 job opportunities in critical industries. Earlier this week, Governor Newsom signed an executive order to help small businesses, granting a 90-day extension for small businesses to pay sales taxes. Governor Newsom also today announced $17.8 million in new state initiatives…

Census is counting on you even during coronavirus

Finally, it’s April. Officially Wednesday was the start of April, but I didn’t want to prematurely declare victory over March in case the calendar flip was merely an April Fool’s trick and Thursday turned out to be March 33. But as I write this on April 2, this seems to be April for real. I have to be honest, so far I’m not seeing a lot of difference. We’re all likely to be stuck at home through April 30 at least. To paraphrase the Who, “meet the new month, same as the old month.” Still, this March-like month has a new name, and that counts for something. Did you get a census form? I did. On March 17, right after the stay-at-home order had gone out for L.A. County and on my first, disorienting day of working from home, the mail included an envelope from the U.S. Census Bureau. My reaction was to laugh in disbelief and set the envelope aside for later. Laughing not because the census isn’t important. Laughing because of the timing. The census folks were already worried about getting everyone counted, and…

These are the best 40 photos in March by our photographers

Ontario Christian’s Taryn Galindo, from left, Clarisa Quintinilla, and Emily Carrillo, run towards the bench after Carrillo scored the winning goal in overtime against Linfield Christian to win 2-1 in the CIF State Division V girls soccer regional semifinal match at home, Ontario, Thursday, March 5, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A sign of the times flashes at Mt. San Antonio College in Walnut on Sunday, March 22, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) The crowd shouts from the cheap seats backed up by cardboard cutouts of the team as host Ontario Christian defeats Linfield Christian 2-1 in overtime during the CIF State Division V girls soccer regional semifinal match Thursday, March 5, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Eddie Estrada of Fontana, left, elbow bumps with Lighthouse Church Pastor Cecil Richardson at a drive-in church service in Fontana on Sunday, March 29, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Lighthouse Church’s First Lady Linda Richardson ties on a mask before videotaping her husband leading a drive-in service in Fontana on Sunday, March 29, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)…

Inland Empire Community Foundation reaching out to groups affected by coronavirus

Inland Empire Community Foundation requests input from nonprofit groups to help respond to pressing needs during the COVID-19 outbreak. The foundation serves the community as a hub for local philanthropy as the region’s largest, nationally certified community foundation. Currently, it is working with local nonprofit organizations, national organizations and philanthropists to examine the challenges and respond as strategically as possible. “COVID-19 is straining local nonprofits of all sizes and missions, with the loss of revenue from canceled fundraisers to having to adapt to new technology and find ways to care for vulnerable communities while keeping staff safe, it’s pretty unreal, especially for community groups with small budgets and big hearts,” foundation CEO Michelle Decker said. “The nonprofits in the Inland Empire are a crucial part of the fabric of our communities. Right now, many are making sure people are sheltered and fed,” she said. “Longer term, we want to make sure we come out of this with our youth-serving groups, our immigrant serving organizations, our arts venues and more. This is really an all-hands-on-deck moment to care for our nonprofits, who do so much for…

Teachers union pushes back on LAUSD distance-learning methods amid coronavirus outbreak

In the throes of bargaining, powerful teachers union United Teachers Los Angeles demanded more leeway from the Los Angeles Unified School District Thursday to conduct remote learning during potentially prolonged campus closures due to the coronavirus epidemic. In a morning Facebook live address Thursday, United Teachers Los Angeles President Alex Caputo-Pearl said that teaching via live video-conferencing should be non-mandatory and that administrators should not join Zoom or other live classes, among other demands outlined in a letter to the district. “Our members need to be left alone to do their work with students and families. We are not going to stand for ridiculous micromanagement, onerous directives and time wasting regimes that principals or local district personnel come up with,” Caputo-Pearl said. An LAUSD spokesperson said the district did not have a response to the demands as of Thursday morning. The district’s teachers, who have been navigating an abrupt transition to distance learning for three weeks following campus closures that began March 16, are on the cusp of a Cesar Chavez holiday Friday and week-long spring break. A letter sent to the district on April…

Upland approves warehouse/logistics center after months of debate

A large logistics warehouse and package delivery center rumored to be for Amazon was approved by the Upland City Council late Wednesday, April 1, ending months of hearings, public opposition and strenuous debate. The El Segundo-based Bridge Development Partners will build a 201,096-square-foot warehouse with truck bays and parking for more than 1,000 delivery vans on 50-plus acres of empty land located northeast of Central Avenue and Foothill Boulevard in western Upland. “This is a great project and it will be great for the future of Upland,” said Mayor Pro-Tem Ricky Felix. Votes on the project’s environmental review, site and design plan and development agreement came during a five-hour special City Council meeting. The meeting and public hearing were conducted according to stay-at-home protocols in place due to the new coronavirus emergency, barring members of the public from attending but allowing them to comment via telephone hook-up. More on this developing story to come.

Experts tell White House coronavirus can spread through talking or even just breathing

A prestigious scientific panel told the White House Wednesday night that research shows coronavirus can be spread not just by sneezes or coughs, but also just by talking, or possibly even just breathing. “While the current [coronavirus] specific research is limited, the results of available studies are consistent with aerosolization of virus from normal breathing,” according to the letter, written by Dr. Harvey Fineberg, chairman of a committee with the National Academy of Sciences. Fineberg told CNN that he will wear start wearing a mask when he goes to the grocery store. “I’m not going to wear a surgical mask, because clinicians need those,” said Fineberg, former dean of the Harvard School of Public Health. “But I have a nice western-style bandana I might wear. Or I have a balaclava. I have some pretty nice options.” Dr. Anthony Fauci, a key member of the White House’s coronavirus task force, told CNN Tuesday that the idea of recommending broad use of masks in the US to prevent the spread of coronavirus is under “very active discussion” by the group. Fineberg, chair of the NAS’ Standing Committee…

3,000% jump in jobless claims devastates US job market

The last three weeks have marked one of the most devastating periods in history for the American job market, as first-time claims for unemployment benefits have surged more than 3,000% since early March. Businesses continue to lay off and furlough workers amid the coronavirus outbreak. 6.6 million US workers filed for their first week of unemployment benefits in the week ending March 28, according to the Department of Labor — a new historic high. That was far greater than economists had expected, and more than 3,000% the pre-pandemic levels. Unemployment claims at this level suggest a severe job market decline hardly any American alive has ever seen in their lifetimes. Economists characterized the increase as “monstrous,” “stunningly awful,” and “a portrait of disaster.” Including the prior week’s 3.3 million initial claims, Americans have filed nearly 10 million jobless claims in the last two weeks alone. That corresponds to roughly 6% of America’s 165 million strong work force, which in turn implies a 9.5% unemployment rate, according to Citi economist Andrew Hollenhorst. “Further job loss expected in coming weeks is very likely to push unemployment above…

More than 40 “spring breakers” test positive for coronavirus

Dozens of spring breakers from Texas boarded a plane for fun and came home with coronavirus. About 70 people in their 20s chartered a plane from Austin, Texas, to Mexico for spring break two weeks ago. They went against the advice of White House officials who asked that people avoid gathering in groups of more than 10 and nonessential air travel. Now 44 of those people have tested positive for coronavirus — all of them University of Texas at Austin students, a university spokesman told CNN on Wednesday. An elected official had a blunt message for the spring breakers. “Quit being an a**,” Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen told CNN affiliate KXAN. “Get over yourselves. Whether you think this is an issue or not, it is. Whether you think it could affect you or not, it does. The reality of it is, if I’m a college kid who’s going to spring break in Mexico, you’re affecting a lot of people. Grow up.” What’s also alarming is that some of the passengers who went on the trip to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, took commercial flights home,…

Carl Love: Coronavirus school closure turns veteran teacher into rookie

Flipgrid, Haiku, Office 365, Zoom — it all used to be so much gibberish to me. Now it’s how I teach. In these days of school shutdowns across the land, kids learning at home, parents trying to cope with what’s left of their jobs and “now I have to teach my kid too!,” here comes this distance-learning stuff. It’s done with the tools I mentioned (and so, so many more), platforms seemingly multiplying by the minute like the novel coronavirus we’re all so terrified of. I’ve taught elementary school in Murrieta for 21 years and, up until a couple weeks ago, I thought I was pretty good at it. Now I feel like a first-year teacher again struggling with a terrible class and thinking “Why did I sign up for this career?” One thing we teachers advise kids as they struggle with a new concept is to have a “growth mindset,” meaning persevere, don’t give up, you learn best from your mistakes, blah, blah, blah. The opposite of this philosophy is the dreaded “fixed mindset,” where the students quit, put their heads down on their…

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!