Cockroaches, overflowing sewage: Restaurant closures in San Bernardino County, July 16-22

Here are the restaurants and other food facilities that San Bernardino County health inspectors temporarily shut down because of imminent health hazards between July 16 and 22, 2021. If no reopening date is mentioned, the agency had not listed that facility as reopened as of this publication. Casa Ortega, 593 Highway 138, Pinon Hills Closed: July 21 Grade: 89/B Reason: Cockroach infestation. The inspector spotted three live roaches in and under the dishwashing sink and on the floor, plus a dead roach on the floor. Reopened: July 22. The inspector did still find one live baby roach in a hallway and several dead roaches on the floor and a bar refrigerator, as well as old rodent droppings behind the same fridge. Another follow-up was planned next week to make sure the infestation is gone. Food area of Salvation Army Pine Summit Camp, 700 S. Wren Drive, Big Bear Lake Closed: July 21 Grade: 84/B Reason: Overflowing sewage. Sewage wastewater was covering the kitchen floor, and the inspector wrote that the operator said a mechanic was working on the problem but that “sewage overflow is a…

Superintendents in Orange County see ethnic studies as key to learning and to a just society

Four Orange County school superintendents offered their ideas on ethnic studies this week, explaining why their districts are offering courses that some parents praise as much-needed and others criticize as liberal indoctrination. In an online forum hosted by the Orange County Department of Education Wednesday, July 21, the superintendents and other educators said students, and society, benefit by studying versions of American history and culture that incorporate multicultural points of view. They also took some pointed questions. “We have to be thoughtful about meeting the needs of our community,” said Andrew Pulver, superintendent of Los Alamitos Unified, which took heat earlier this year for adopting social justice teaching standards and approving an ethnic studies elective. Pulver said students and parents asked for ethnic studies after last summer’s social justice protests, some of which took place in front of Los Alamitos High. Before that, some students and parents had complained of racist incidents at Los Alamitos Unified, a once predominantly white district where the majority of students now enrolled are minorities. In 2018, for example, one Black student said she was asked why her legs were…

NFL coach Greg Knapp dies from injuries sustained in San Ramon bike crash

Longtime NFL coach Greg Knapp has passed away from injuries sustained in Saturday’s bike crash, when a car struck him near his Danville home. He was 58. Knapp, according to sources, sustained serious brain trauma as well as other injuries. He’d been in Walnut Creek’s John Muir Health Medical Center since the incident, and his death at 11:32 a.m. was confirmed by a hospital spokesman. “We all miss Knapper and I believe he has touched us deeply,” said Jim Mora, a longtime friend and coaching colleague. “Greg loved to laugh, tease, live large and loud, and love on his family and friends. He was a sincere man who we all loved, trusted and respected.” Mora visited Knapp in the hospital this week and relayed updates to their close friends. Mora and Knapp coached together on the 49ers from 1997-03 under Steve Mariucci and then Dennis Erickson. Knapp served as offensive coordinator when Mora coached the Atlanta Falcons (2004-06) and Seattle Seahawks (2009). A Seal Beach native who attended high school in Huntington Beach, Knapp served as an NFL assistant for over 25 years, starting with…

Exceptional Opportunities helps children with special needs in Riverside County

Throughout Cheryl Stark’s years as an educator of children with special needs she has worked to ensure her students have adaptive equipment and the assistive technology to experience life to its fullest. It’s required writing grants and as she honed her skills, she was also able to help former students and family friends receive new wheelchair accessible vans. The COVID-19 pandemic made Stark more aware of how much families needed equipment and technology in their homes. None of the equipment available in school was going home with students and many were no longer receiving the therapies. Wanting to help, Stark raised funds to purchase technology to assist them. One of her passions is to keep kids active. In the past she had used Rifton Tricycles in class and realized that if she started a nonprofit, she could pursue the goal of purchasing tricycles so that kids could ride with their family and neighbors. With this in mind, she established Exceptional Opportunities in December 2020. Isaiah Fields receives his Rifton Tricycle from Exceptional Opportunities. (Courtesy of Exceptional Opportunities) “Exceptional is such a great word,” Stark said.…

Another blow to Bloomington residents battling trucking industry development

Bloomington residents battling San Bernardino County over trucking industry development in their unincorporated community were dealt another blow Thursday, July 22, when the Planning Commission approved a storage yard and maintenance facility for up to 260 trucks and trailers. Following a public hearing in which 14 people spoke out against the project, the panel approved the project on a 3-1 vote, with Commissioner Kareem Gongora voting no and Commissioner Raymond Allard recusing himself. “In my business as a engineer, I have recently worked for the developer in other jurisdictions,” Allard said in an email following the meeting. The proposed development is located on a 9-acre parcel almost catty-corner to a planned truck fueling station on the southeast corner of Cedar and Santa Ana avenues that residents and the Colton Joint Unified School District also oppose, but the county Board of Supervisors approved on April 6. Environmental concerns Opponents are concerned about increased air pollution, runoff, noise and aesthetic impacts from the development, and prefer commercial retail and restaurants in the area — businesses that will bring jobs and improve the community’s tax base and quality…

This is why Riverside County had to correct inaccuracies in COVID-19 data

A computer code offered to counties by the California Department of Public Health in November as coronavirus cases were beginning to surge statewide caused discrepancies in case and death numbers released by Riverside County, which is why epidemiologists and data researchers spent some time last month correcting those numbers, the county’s lead epidemiologist said Thursday, July 22. Last month, the county had hit pause on releasing daily numbers to reconcile inaccurate data. On Thursday, county officials confirmed that they have started posting daily COVID-19 data again now that the inaccuracies have been resolved. State public health officials offered the new code in November to simplify things, but it ended up causing complications and the county had to correct the data, leading to delays in getting information out to the public, said Wendy Hetherington, Riverside County’s chief of epidemiology. “During the (winter) surge, the number of new cases was causing a backlog in terms of the staff being able to handle the numbers,” she said. “So, CDPH gave counties an option to enable an auto-confirm function in the disease reporting system to speed up the process…

With 34% of its electric buses inoperable, Foothill Transit searches for fixes

More than one-third of Foothill Transit’s fleet of electric buses are inoperable, with one bus destroyed and removed from service after it caught fire during recharging and others out with stalling issues or awaiting replacement parts, the agency reported. About 11 of its 32 electric buses were down as of Wednesday, July 21, reported Felicia Friesema, spokesperson for Foothill Transit, which serves the San Gabriel Valley, parts of Los Angeles and western San Bernardino Valley, including a hub at the Montclair Transit Center. The agency maintains a fleet of 373 buses; 32 are electric and 341 compressed natural gas. In early July, only three of the 15 electric buses operating from the Pomona maintenance yard were available, while parts for the other 12 buses have been unavailable for months, according to a comprehensive report from Roland Cordero, director of maintenance and vehicle technology. One bus has been out of service for 275 days because parts are unavailable, he reported. Some were repaired this week, Friesema said. About 47% of the electric buses operating out of the Arcadia yard were out of service in April, due…

Riverside street to be named for ‘Spanishtown’ pioneer community

A mile-long section of Riverside’s Orange Street is getting a second name: Spanishtown Road. City officials say the change will take place north of the 60 Freeway, calling attention to a historic settlement that predates Riverside’s founding and the 159-year-old Trujillo Adobe — one of the Inland Empire’s oldest structures. Mayor Patricia Lock Dawson said the name Orange Street isn’t going away and people living along it won’t have to change addresses. Spanish Town Heritage Foundation officers from left, Nancy Melendez, president, Sharon Kasner, secretary, and Darlene Elliot, VP, stand at the corner of Orange and Center Streets on Thursday, July 22, 2021. The Riverside City Council approved a plan to add the name SpanishTown Rd. to Orange St. between Center St. and Columbia Ave. in Riverside’s Northside neighborhood. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Spanish Town Heritage Foundation officers from left, Sharon Kasner, secretary, Nancy Melendez, president, and Darlene Elliot, VP, stand at the corner of Orange and Center Streets on Thursday, July 22, 2021. All are descendants of Lorenzo Trujillo. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Nancy Melendez, Spanish Town Heritage Foundation president,…

NFL coach Greg Knapp passes away from injuries sustained in San Ramon bike crash

Longtime NFL coach Greg Knapp has passed away from injuries sustained in Saturday’s bike crash, when a car struck him near his Danville home. He was 58. Knapp, according to sources, sustained serious brain trauma as well as other injuries. He’d been in Walnut Creek’s John Muir Health Medical Center since the incident, and his death at 11:32 a.m. was confirmed by a hospital spokesman. “We all miss Knapper and I believe he has touched us deeply,” said Jim Mora, a longtime friend and coaching colleague. “Greg loved to laugh, tease, live large and loud, and love on his family and friends. He was a sincere man who we all loved, trusted and respected.” Mora visited Knapp in the hospital this week and relayed updates to their close friends. Mora and Knapp coached together on the 49ers from 1997-03 under Steve Mariucci and then Dennis Erickson. Knapp served as offensive coordinator when Mora coached the Atlanta Falcons (2004-06) and Seattle Seahawks (2009). A Seal Beach native who attended high school in Huntington Beach, Knapp served as an NFL assistant for over 25 years, starting with…

Murrieta native graduates from U.S. Army Ranger School

U.S. Army Sgt. Joshua Cardwell of Murrieta has graduated from the U.S. Army Ranger School at Fort Benning in Georgia. (Courtesy of the U.S. Army) U.S. Army Sgt. Joshua Cardwell of Murrieta, an orthopedic specialist for Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital, recently graduated from the U.S. Army Ranger School at Fort Benning in Georgia. The ranger course, developed during the Korean War, was designed to build the combat skills of selected officers and enlisted personnel, requiring them to perform effectively as small-unit leaders in a realistic, tactical environment. Ranger School is one of the toughest training courses in the Army and consists of 61 days of training broken down into three phases, according to a news release. “Ranger school is a leadership course. We developed squad and platoon leadership skills with the added stressors of sleep and food deprivation,”  Cardwell said in the news release. “The course was challenging. We went non-stop for the full 61 days with 30 minutes of sleep each day if we were lucky. Every day we carried a heavy load, conducted a variety of different missions or patrols and exerted ourselves…

Olympic surfing 101: What to know for the sport’s debut into summer games

Forty surfers are about to make Olympic history, debuting the wave-riding sport for the first time in front of millions of viewers. More than most of the other 41 sports in the summer games, surfers will have the added drama of relying on Mother Nature to bring a wave of action for the athletes in the water. The unpredictability of the ocean can be a factor that makes or breaks a podium finish for the athletes, who are already at Tsurigasaki Beach in Japan warming up in the waters where the surf contest is expected to kick off this weekend. In Southern California, surfing is a popular pastime and sport, but even the most seasoned surfers might need a guide for what’s to come at the Tokyo games. Here’s a bit of Olympic surfing 101 to get you stoked for the sport’s debut: Surfer Anat Lelior, of Israel, rides a wave during a practice session at Tsurigasaki beach at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics in Ichinomiya, Japan, Wednesday, July 21, 2021. (AP Photo/David Goldman) Will there be surf? One of the most important elements for surfers…

Rancho Cucamonga native serves aboard the USS Charleston

U.S. Navy Electrician’s Mate 1st Class Michael Critelli of Rancho Cucamonga collects a water sample for a fuel test aboard the USS Charleston. (Courtesy of the U.S. Navy) U.S. Navy Electrician’s Mate 1st Class Michael Critelli of Rancho Cucamonga is serving aboard Independence-variant littoral combat ship USS Charleston (LCS 18) in the South China Sea. USS Charleston, part of Destroyer Squadron Seven, is on a rotational deployment, operating in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations to enhance interoperability with partners and serve as a ready-response force in support of a free and open Indo-Pacific region, according to a news release. Have your own military accomplishments to share? Send items for possible inclusion in the column to IEcommunity@scng.com.

Curious about the Inland Empire? These 23 books sprawl across its history

When an L.A. journalist asked on Twitter if there was a good Inland Empire history book, she got a lot of responses. One was from me. I didn’t know of such a book but would be an obvious audience for one, I wrote. But I did alert her to the 2006 book “Inlandia: A Literary Journey Through California’s Inland Empire,” which she immediately ordered online. To be clear, “Inlandia” is not a formal history but a literary anthology that includes pieces of nonfiction and memoir alongside fiction from the 18th to 21st centuries. It’s still a way of coming to terms with the region from multiple angles and perspectives. At the time I brought it up, I hadn’t started reading it — is that wrong? — but not long afterward I did, and I wrote a column about it. “Inlandia,” I said, was a useful introduction to the broader Inland Empire for me. But what other books came up in reply to that Twitter question? Here are 10 titles from the hive mind. “A Colony for California: Riverside’s First 100 Years” and “From Acorns to…

San Bernardino council pursues censuring Mayor John Valdivia

The San Bernardino City Council has taken the first step toward censuring Mayor John Valdivia. Over the next several days, City Attorney Sonia Carvalho will meet with council members individually to log their respective reasons for censuring the city’s top elected official. A resolution to censure Valdivia will come before the council next month for approval. All council members but Juan Figueroa favored the move. “I believe there’s been a long train of reasons that John Valdivia could have and, in my opinion, should have been censured over the last eight or so years, both as a council member and now as mayor,” Councilman Fred Shorett said Wednesday, July 21, at the conclusion of the evening’s council meeting. “I believe the list is long and in some cases very serious, exposing the city to significant damages.” Shorett, who proposed placing the censure on a future council agenda, said in his statement Wednesday he was just now bringing such an action forward because the mayor “went way over the line with his hubris, arrogance and self-indulging political aspirations with the State of the City event a…

In 1918, dancing was banned in Riverside high schools

In 1918 people were dancing the foxtrot, the one-step, and the quick-step to ragtime music and songs about the war in Europe. Dancing at school parties had been allowed for several years by Riverside Polytechnic High School (which was for boys-only at that time) and Riverside Girls’ High School, the only high schools in the Riverside, Moreno Valley and Jurupa Valley areas at that time. However, there were people who didn’t like the idea of young people dancing. In February 1918, Grace Methodist and First Baptist churches of Riverside both passed resolutions requesting the school board ban dancing by students on any school district property. The resolution was presented to the school board at the February 12 meeting. After much discussion, the school board tabled the issue until their next meeting. On Feb. 16, an article in the Riverside Enterprise mentioned that “to dance or not to dance” was quite the issue of discussion in the community, particularly between school children and their parents. The Enterprise expected that there would be a “lively contest” at the next school board meeting, as “both sides of the…

Victorville councilwoman, masked man arrested during chaotic meeting

Pandemonium erupted at this week’s Victorville City Council meeting when sheriff’s deputies arrested Councilwoman Blanca Gomez after she tried to prevent them from removing a masked man from the building for recording the meeting on his cellphone. The ruckus occurred nearly five hours into Tuesday’s meeting, which was abruptly halted after Gomez stood up from behind the dais and walked over to two deputies trying to remove the man, who was wearing what appeared to be a black scarf over his face and a gray fedora. He was identified as Robert Daniel Rodriguez. In this screen grab from video of the July 20, 2021 Victorville City Council meeting, Councilwoman Blanca Gomez gestures as she leaves the dais as sheriff’s deputies confront Robert Daniel Rodriguez (bottom right of screen, in gray fedora)), who was recording the meeting with his cellphone. (Via YouTube) In the recorded video of the meeting, Rodriguez, seated in the third row, is seen holding papers over his face and holding up his cellphone recording the council. Mayor Debra Jones asked City Manager Andre de Bortnowsky if Rodriguez had a right to record…

Professing Faith: Rome burned but Christianity survived

This week marks a very old anniversary, which has had a huge influence on religion in the West. As your author names this event, it will at first sound like antiquarian rambling, but there is a direct link to the faith of many people today. It was this past week and next which marks the anniversary of the burning of the city of Rome in 64 AD. It began on the night of July 19 and ended about nine days later. Shortly after that the first Roman persecution of the Christian church began because of the fire, at the very time when the New Testament was being written. As for the fire itself, it began in a shopping district near the great chariot racetrack, the Circus Maximus. From there it spread to the entire area around the track and it raged for three days before the authorities managed to put it out. But several days later the fire reignited and burned for another six days. At the end of the conflagration, two-thirds of the city was in ruins, tens of thousands were homeless and trade…

65% increase in COVID-19 hospitalizations in a week, Riverside County reports

Riverside County hospitals are treating the most coronavirus patients they’ve seen since March, according to data released Wednesday, July 21. There are currently 155 confirmed and 31 suspected patients hospitalized, a 65% increase from July 14. This latest figure is the highest hospital count since the county reported 156 COVID-19 patients on March 20. The number of patients in hospital intensive care units has also increased — currently there are 30 confirmed and five suspected patients — the most reported since March 31, when the same number were admitted. Riverside County reported 1,991 new infections and 10 deaths Wednesday. Comparisons of infection and death rates have not been available in recent weeks due to data discrepancies. Efforts to reconcile infection and death counts between the county and state wrapped up last week, Jose Arballo Jr., spokesperson for Riverside County’s public health department, said Wednesday. Vaccination rates in the county jumped 57% from the previous week ending July 14. This puts the county’s total of fully vaccinated people at 1,024,327. Here are the latest numbers. Vaccination and hospitalization data comes from the state and is current…

California Dolphin