Conservative Christian PAC’s 7 school board candidates running in Lake Elsinore, Murrieta, Temecula

Following last week’s filing deadline, seven candidates endorsed by a group seeking Christian conservative majorities on southwest Riverside County school boards have qualified to run in the Nov. 8 general election. Jason Craig, Danny Gonzalez, Joseph Komrosky and Jen Wiersma are challenging incumbents for seats on the Temecula Valley Unified School District board, according to the unofficial candidate list from the county Registrar of Voters. Also, Courtney Cooper and Nick Pardue are seeking Murrieta Valley Unified School District board seats and Jill Leonard is running in the Lake Elsinore Unified School District. All seven have the support of the Inland Empire Family PAC. On its website, the PAC said it “works to stop the indoctrination of our children by placing candidates on school boards who will fight for Christian and Conservative values.” While “we were hoping for more candidates, (we) look forward to throwing a huge victory party for all seven of our endorsed candidates come November,” 412 Church Temecula Valley Pastor Tim Thompson, who is listed in the PAC’s paperwork as a principal officer, said Tuesday, Aug. 16, via email. With the candidates officially

Monkeypox is a health emergency, but don’t panic, Riverside County officials say

Don’t expect the monkeypox outbreak to be as disruptive as the COVID-19 pandemic, Riverside County officials said after the Board of Supervisors ratified a monkey public health emergency. “This is not COVID 2.0,” Supervisor Jeff Hewitt said after the board voted 5-0 Monday, Aug. 15, to ratify the public health emergency declared Monday, Aug. 8, by Public Health Officer Dr. Geoffrey Leung. “The vast majority of people can go back to school (and can) go about their life,” Hewitt said. “We will do everything from our end of it to suppress this and … get back closer to normal.” The county had 94 confirmed or probably monkeypox cases as of Tuesday, Aug. 16, including the first case in a female. When Riverside County declared its emergency, San Bernardino County spokesperson David Wert said the county had no plans to do the same. Los Angeles County declared an emergency Aug. 2. Most cases are in the Coachella Valley, but at least a handful are in western Riverside County. No county deaths from monkeypox have been reported. With cases doubling “very quickly,” Leung said he declared the

Pomona family receives World War II veteran’s medals 60 years after his death

A World War II veteran who died 60 years ago finally got his due recognition this week, including a slew of medals and ribbons never awarded to him. At a ceremony Monday, August 15, U.S. Rep. Norma Torres presented the Pomona family of Lt. Adriano Barcelona Cartagena with eight medals and ribbons, including the Bronze Star and Prisoner of War Medal. About 20 family members gathered for the posthumous awards ceremony at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 12 in La Verne. Claro Cartagena looks at the folded American flag given to him and his family by Congresswoman Norma Torres during a posthumous medal ceremony for his late father, Lt. Adriano Barcelona Cartagena, at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 12 in La Verne on Monday, Aug. 15, 2022. Cartagena, who died in 1962, served with the Philippine Army under the direction of Gen. Douglas MacArthur during World War II in the South Pacific. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) Lt. Adriano Barcelona Cartagena’s sons, Manuel Cartagena, left, 77, and Antonio, right, 75, sit with their respective wives, Lutching and Nora, after the

Kaiser Permanente plans $1.7 billion hospital, office expansion in Riverside County

One of the area’s leading healthcare providers has embarked on a major construction campaign in western Riverside County. “Our community is growing and Kaiser Permanente is growing with it through $1.7 billion in expansion projects at four locations across Riverside County,” said Dr. Sammy Totah, senior vice president and area manager for Kaiser’s Riverside County area. When completed, the facilities will boost the availability of medical services and “make more specialized care available closer to home,” Totah said. The projects include expansions of Kaiser’s Riverside and Moreno Valley hospitals, construction of a second medical office building in Murrieta and a new Wildomar medical office. An artist’s rendering shows Kaiser Permanente’s plans to expand its Riverside Medical Center on Magnolia Avenue. The artwork depicts what the campus will look like from a front aerial view. (Courtesy of Kaiser Permanente) An artist’s rendering shows the main entrance to Kaiser Permanente’s Riverside Medical Center after an expansion project targeted for completion in 2027. (Courtesy of Kaiser Permanente) An artist’s rendering offers a view of a new parking structure planned for Kaiser Permanente’s Riverside Medical Center. (Courtesy of Kaiser

Kaiser plans $1.7 billion hospital, office expansion in Riverside County

One of the area’s leading healthcare providers has embarked on a major construction campaign in western Riverside County. “Our community is growing and Kaiser Permanente is growing with it through $1.7 billion in expansion projects at four locations across Riverside County,” said Dr. Sammy Totah, senior vice president and area manager for Kaiser’s Riverside County area. When completed, the facilities will boost the availability of medical services and “make more specialized care available closer to home,” Totah said. The projects include expansions of Kaiser’s Riverside and Moreno Valley hospitals, construction of a second medical office building in Murrieta and a new Wildomar medical office. An artist’s rendering shows Kaiser Permanente’s plans to expand its Riverside Medical Center on Magnolia Avenue. The artwork depicts what the campus will look like from a front aerial view. (Courtesy of Kaiser Permanente) An artist’s rendering shows the main entrance to Kaiser Permanente’s Riverside Medical Center after an expansion project targeted for completion in 2027. (Courtesy of Kaiser Permanente) An artist’s rendering offers a view of a new parking structure planned for Kaiser Permanente’s Riverside Medical Center. (Courtesy of Kaiser

Does asserting the Fifth Amendment mean you’re guilty? Ask the lawyer

Q: President Trump recently had a deposition in a civil case in New York about financial matters and asserted the Fifth Amendment. If you “take the Fifth” in a civil case in California, does that mean you’re guilty? T.M., Rancho Palos Verdes Ron Sokol A: The Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution guarantees that an individual cannot be compelled by the government to provide incriminating information. The Fifth Amendment right “to remain silent” can be pleaded in a criminal or a civil case. In a civil case in California, neither the court nor counsel may comment on the fact that a witness has asserted the Fifth Amendment privilege. Further, the trier of fact may not draw any inference as to the credibility of the witness, or as to any matter at issue in the proceeding. This is at odds, however, with the federal court standard, as well as with a number of other states permitting adverse inferences to be drawn against parties in civil cases who refuse to testify. Taking the Fifth in California in a civil case may also limit or preclude the

Does decades-old smallpox vaccination protect against monkeypox?

Health officials are scrambling to stretch scarce doses of vaccine to slow the mounting monkeypox outbreak, but do older people already vaccinated as kids for the related but deadlier smallpox virus already have protection? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention isn’t betting on it. The U.S. health agency says those exposed to the monkeypox virus “who have not received the smallpox vaccine within the last 3 years should consider getting vaccinated.” And on Monday, the CDC endorsed a strategy of giving the smallpox vaccine under the skin — at a fifth of the usual dose. While a limited number of studies offer hopeful signs that childhood smallpox vaccination offers some enduring protection decades later, health experts say aging Baby Boomers whose arms may still bear the marks of those childhood inoculations shouldn’t assume they’re immune. “I wouldn’t say there’s no protection,” said Andrew Noymer, an associate professor of population health and disease prevention at the University of California, Irvine. “But it’s not something I would just count on.” Smallpox, a highly contagious ancient scourge that killed three out of 10 people it infected and left

Inland candidate isn’t registered to vote in Assembly district he wants to represent

A candidate for a state Assembly seat representing part of Riverside County is not registered to vote in the district he’s seeking to represent, according to voter registration records and county officials. Bilal “Bill” Essayli, 36, is running as a Republican in the November general election for California’s newly drawn 63rd Assembly District, which includes Norco, Canyon Lake, Menifee and Lake Elsinore as well as parts of Riverside, Eastvale and Corona. But on June 7 — the day of California’s primary election, Essayli registered to vote in Orange County, public records reviewed by the Southern California News Group reveal. Essayli said he’s still a valid candidate in the 63rd District. No part of the district, which took shape through political redistricting in 2021, is in Orange County. Essayli was registered to vote in the 63rd when he filed paperwork to run for Assembly, and Riverside County on Feb. 16 affirmed his ability to run in the 63rd’s primary. Bill Essayli, a Republican running for the 63rd Assembly District that represents parts of Riverside County, registered to vote in Orange County on June 7, 2022, records show.

Here’s who’s on Nov. 8 ballot in San Bernardino County, Pomona and Claremont

Voters have more work to do. Months after they voted in the June primary, they’ll be asked to cast ballots in the Nov. 8 general election. In addition to choosing candidates for Congress, state Senate and Assembly, this November voters will determine who fills seats on city councils, school board and other local offices. Here’s a partial look at who qualified for the ballot as of Monday, Aug. 15. The filing deadline was Friday, Aug. 12, but in cases where an incumbent is not running, the filing deadline has been extended to Wednesday, Aug. 17. The San Bernardino County Registrar of Voters considers this list unofficial until a certified list of candidates is received from the California Secretary of State’s office on Sept. 1. The county is scheduled to release its official candidates list by Sept. 6, according to spokeswoman Melissa Eickman. This list does not include uncontested races or judicial races on the November ballot. CONGRESS 23rd Congressional District (Adelanto, Apple Valley, Barstow, Big Bear City, Hesperia, Twentynine Palms, Victorville, Yucaipa and Yucca Valley, parts of Colton, Highland, Loma Linda, Redlands and San Bernardino) Jay

Here’s who’s on the Nov. 8 ballot in Riverside County

Think you had a lot of choices in the June primary election? There’s even more on the Nov. 8 general election ballot. Besides choosing candidates for statewide offices, state legislature and Congress and deciding the fate of statewide ballot measures, Riverside County voters also have to decide who fills seats on school boards, city councils and boards of other local public agencies. Here’s a partial look at who’s running in Riverside County in November, now that the Friday, Aug. 12, filing deadline has passed. Uncontested races are not included. The filing deadline for candidates was extended in some races because the incumbent did not file by 5 p.m. Friday. CONGRESS 25th Congressional District (Banning, Beaumont, Blythe, Cathedral City, Coachella, Desert Hot Springs, part of Hemet, Indio, Needles and San Jacinto) Brian Hawkins, Republican Raul Ruiz, Democrat (incumbent) 39th Congressional District (Jurupa Valley, Moreno Valley, Perris and part of Riverside) Aja Smith, Republican Mark Takano, Democrat (incumbent) 41st Congressional District (Calimesa, Canyon Lake, Indian Wells, Lake Elsinore, La Quinta, Menifee, Norco, Palm Desert, Palm Springs, Rancho Mirage and Wildomar, and parts of Corona, Eastvale and Riverside)

Fontana Unified School District names Juan M. Lopez interim superintendent

Longtime educator Juan M. López has been tapped to serve as interim superintendent of the Fontana Unified School District, effective Sept. 6. He will fill the role through Jan. 13, 2023, as the district searches for a permanent top administrator. López called his appointment an honor in a news release. “The key to a district’s success starts with a leadership team that is dedicated to working for the greater good of all children,” he said, “and I look forward to joining this District’s team and supporting its mission of empowering every student to unlock their full potential.” Former Fontana Unified Superintendent Randal S. Bassett stepped down from the post Aug. 1 after nearly six years in the role. His resignation came amid an administrative investigation into allegations that Fontana School Police Detective David Wilbert has been insulated by his superiors and school district administrators against allegations of violent and inappropriate conduct involving students and fellow officers spanning more than a decade. Bassett had been in the top administrative seat since December 2016. Monica Makiewicz, a top district official, is presently serving as acting superintendent. The

Pioneer, who came west to San Bernardino, later went east to fight in the Civil War 

Pioneer Sydney P. Waite’s obituary described spending most of his adult life in San Bernardino “except for a two year hazardous trip to Tennessee in 1862-63.” The Nov. 28, 1920, article in the Sun newspaper curiously offered no details about this “hazardous trip.” But the newspaper was perhaps unwilling to besmirch Waite’s memory by revealing that his absence from San Bernardino was made to join Confederate forces during the Civil War. His war experience was short-lived due to being wounded at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee in April 1862. Waite was certainly a man on the move, at least in his youth. Before his Civil War adventure, he already had some prominence locally as he and his Kentucky family were among the first 49ers to reach the Inland Empire by wagon via Cajon Pass. But it was a decade later that Waite was exposed to more than mineral riches while prospecting in the Big Bear and Holcomb valleys. He met miners there from the South who supported the secession of the Southern states following the election of Abraham Lincoln. Many vowed to leave the

LA, Long Beach ports hail supply chain progress — but keep watch on rail cargo slowdowns

In January, a record 109 ships awaited entry into the combined ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, often stretching to south Orange County. It marked a peak in the supply chain congestion that has bedeviled the nation’s two busiest ports during much of the pandemic. On Thursday, Aug. 11, that number stood at nine ships. “Just amazing” Port of L.A. Executive Director Gene Seroka said about the decline. “We’ve reduced the number of anchored ships by 90-some percent,” Seroka said in a recent phone interview, “while still moving record amounts of cargo in the first six months of this year.” Among the most impactful tools the ports are now utilizing are sophisticated digital data trackers that give the seaports invaluable information on what ships are headed their way, how much cargo they’re bringing in and when they will arrive. “We’re a lot smarter than we were a year ago,” Seroka said, adding that collaboration has seen a big boost throughout the supply chain as solutions are explored. “I feel really good about where we are compared to last October,” Seroka said, adding that while

Senior living: How to reduce the risks of falls in older adults

By Elissa Lee and Albert Jiang,  Contributing Writers  Roger first fell in the shower. “It could have been worse,” said Roger, 83, whose name was changed for patient confidentiality. “I caught the wall first and slid down. I couldn’t get up and yelled for help for 15 minutes before my caregiver came. “When she finally found me,” Roger added, “she struggled to get me up because I was naked and slippery (in the shower).” By the time the caregiver was able to help Roger back up, they were both drenched and exhausted. “I noticed that the next few days she was limping a bit,” Roger said, “but she denies that she got hurt.” Elissa Lee, OTD, OTR. (Photo courtesy of Elissa Lee) Albert Jiang is a physical therapist in the Bay Area. He has a doctorate in physical therapy. (Photo courtesy of Albert Jiang) There are many reasons people fall: You reach over to retrieve the farther-than-you-expected shampoo bottle in the shower, trip over the edge of a rug that slightly shifted during your grandchildren’s last visit, miss a step going down the stairs you

Auditions open for San Bernardino Symphony Youth Wind Ensemble

Auditions are open for the San Bernardino Symphony Youth Wind Ensemble’s fall season. The Youth Wind Ensemble, open to woodwind, brass and percussion students from 14 to 21, was established in 2021 and is conducted by Nicholas Bratcher, director of bands at Cal State San Bernardino. Young musicians from the the Inland Empire, Coachella Valley and surrounding areas who are members of their schools’ music programs are invited to apply, and scholarships are available. The group rehearses 2 p.m. select Sundays at San Bernardino Valley College. The first rehearsal this fall is scheduled Sept. 11, and this year’s concerts are scheduled Nov. 6 and April 30. Auditions are to be submitted virtually by Sept. 1. For audition details, go to sanbernardinosymphony.org/youthwindensemble.

A.B. Miller High School graduate honored as a 2022 Dance Scholar

Kassandra Hernandez, who graduated this spring from Fontana’s A.B. Miller High School, was one of about 160 high school seniors from across the country honored by the National Honor Society for the Dance Arts as a 2022 Dance Scholar. Hernandez, who has been dancing for as long as she can remember, was selected for A.B. Miller’s Conservatory of Dance when she was a junior. In addition to receiving the National Honor Society for the Dance Arts honor, Hernandez received A.B. Miller’s 2022 Artistic Merit award, Dance Star award and Conservatory of Dance Excellence award, according to a news release. She also received recognition for her work as a visual artist and photographer, with honors from A.B. Miller High School, the Fontana Unified School District and the Arts Education Network for San Bernardino County. “Kassandra is a great dancer and a special student,” Nicole Robinson, dance teacher and A.B. Miller Conservatory of Dance founder, said in the news release. “The Conservatory is about more than just dance, it’s about growing as a person, and I’ve had the pleasure to see Kassandra develop her skills in creative and

Subways, buses, walking are the ways to go in New York City

At the start of my New York City vacation, I bought a MetroCard, the all-access transit pass, from a subway vending machine. I splurged on the $34, seven-day version. Best investment ever? Possibly. If Dr. Seuss promoted the MetroCard, he might say, “Oh, the places you’ll go.” As loyal readers will recall, my standard practice on vacation is to get around via public transit rather than rent a car. Cars are pricey, and hotels often charge absurd amounts for parking. And in New York City, there’s little need for a car anyway. Buses, subways, trains, it’s a transit paradise. (Compare that to San Bernardino County, which despite a population above 2 million “will be a transit-free zone” on Labor Day, Henry Fung recently griped on Twitter. Metrolink is doing track maintenance and bus lines are taking the holiday off.) My MetroCard — or, as in the Le Tigre song, “My My MetroCard” — was put to use immediately: I rode the subway to the Bronx for a Yankees day game. A little sorry to be removing my Metro Card transit pass from my wallet after a

Traffic near Murrieta’s new Costco causing problems, some motorists say

The long-awaited Costco store in Murrieta since its opening last week has regularly drawn big crowds of eager shoppers and long lines of cars waiting to fuel up. But the 151,000-square-foot warehouse store — tucked in the northwest corner of The Vineyard shopping complex at Clinton Keith Road and Warm Springs Parkway — has created headaches for others. The store’s opening is central to a major traffic debacle, residents say. Located at 35875 Warm Springs Parkway, the new Costco opened Aug. 5, with crowds visible from the Clinton Keith Road exit off the 215 Freeway. The eight-lane, 32-pump Costco gas station opened a week earlier on July 29. “Lines were wrapped all the way around; they had some good deals for that day,” said Collin Olsson, who attended the grand opening after moving to town this summer. “It’s convenient, and so people who live in Murrieta don’t have to travel down to the Temecula Costco.” But while many Costco fans are excited to not have to drive as far, others have said the crowds cause traffic issues. Neighbors and businesses of the shopping complex as

A look at the Rose Bowl’s 100-year history

It’s not the oldest stadium in the nation. That would be Franklin Field at the University of Pennsylvania. But it could be the most famous. The Rose Bowl was built in 1922 and is recognized as a U.S. National Historic Landmark and a California Historic Civil Engineering landmark. The stadium famous for its bowl game, has hosted Super Bowls, Olympic events, World Cup soccer matches, sold-out concerts and even a flea market. Planting the seeds The first Tournament of Roses Parade was in 1890 and the first football game was held in 1902 (between the University of Michigan and Stanford University) in Tournament Park, but chariot races and other events were substituted, until football became an annual contest in 1916. The stands in Tournament Park were temporary and the city of Pasadena decided it should have a permanent stadium. The stadium was designed by architect Myron Hunt. Hunt’s influence as an architect can be found all around Southern California, including the summer ranch home for cereal magnate Will Keith Kellogg at the present-day campus of Cal Poly Pomona. In 1913, Hunt designed a new wing

A look at the Rose Bowl’s 100 year history

It’s not the oldest stadium in the nation. That would be Franklin Field at the University of Pennsylvania. But it could be the most famous. The Rose Bowl was built in 1922 and is recognized as a U.S. National Historic Landmark and a California Historic Civil Engineering landmark. The stadium famous for its bowl game, has hosted Super Bowls, Olympic events, World Cup soccer matches, sold-out concerts and even a flea market. Planting the seeds The first Tournament of Roses Parade was in 1890 and the first football game was held in 1902 (between the University of Michigan and Stanford University) in Tournament Park, but chariot races and other events were substituted, until football became an annual contest in 1916. The stands in Tournament Park were temporary and the city of Pasadena decided it should have a permanent stadium. The stadium was designed by architect Myron Hunt. Hunt’s influence as an architect can be found all around Southern California, including the summer ranch home for cereal magnate Will Keith Kellogg at the present-day campus of Cal Poly Pomona. In 1913, Hunt designed a new wing

$15 million in state budget secures KVCR’s future as Inland Empire news outlet

KVCR, the Inland Empire’s only public TV and radio station, is set financially for a massive expansion thanks to $15 million in state funding. Diana Z. Rodriguez, chancellor of the San Bernardino Community College District – one of the few such districts in the country that operates both an NPR and a PBS television affiliate – called the money “historic in the life of KVCR,” whose future was uncertain as recently as last year. “This funding will open doors of opportunity,” she said at a news conference Friday, Aug. 12, announcing the budget allocation, “and inspire our students and community for years to come.” Assembly Majority Leader Eloise Gómez Reyes presents $15 million in state funding to KVCR TV/FM inside KVCR studios at San Bernardino Valley College in San Bernardino, California, Friday, Aug. 12, 2022. (Photo by John Valenzuela, Contributing Photographer) San Bernardino Valley College student and KVCR intern Mariana Lapizco smiles during Assembly Majority Leader Eloise Gómez Reyes’ presentation of $15 million in state funding to KVCR TV/FM inside the station’s studio at SBVC in San Bernardino, California, Aug. 12, 2022. (Photo by John