‘5,000 Engulf Rolling Stones’ at final San Bernardino concert in 1966

The Rolling Stones will be back in Southern California on Oct. 17 for a concert at the new SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, resuming the pre-coronavirus No Filter Tour that took them to Pasadena’s Rose Bowl in August 2019. But I’m here to look back at the Rolling Stones of 55 years ago, when the quintet probably all smoked cigarettes — no filter — and played concerts in small halls, not stadiums with 100,000 seats. This ad appeared in the San Bernardino Sun on July 20, 1966. Tickets were $4 and $5. (File photo) Candy Wilkinson bought a balcony ticket for the Stones concert and has held onto it for more than half a century. (Courtesy Candy Wilkinson) The concert was subject of an advance story and a report afterward. Both were by John Morthland, a Sun staff writer who later became a writer for Rolling Stone magazine, where he covered the Altamont Festival. (Photo by David Allen, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) The Rolling Stones are seen in November 1966, four months after their San Bernardino concert, in a photograph by Gered Mankowitz. Another shot from…

San Manuel Landing continues a tradition of trade

By Ken Ramirez Growing up in the 1960s on our small hillside reservation, I remember seeing the cargo planes flying in and out of Norton Air Force Base. The San Manuel Indian Reservation was approximately three miles to the north of the base, but we were worlds apart. I imagine the pilots took no notice of our modest reservation. Things have changed. Now, the reservation is a fully developed community and we are proud to own part of the former Norton Air Force Base. On Friday, we celebrated the groundbreaking of the 50-plus acre San Manuel Landing adjacent to San Bernardino International Airport, the former airbase. This community investment project — that will turn an empty lot into a Class A supply and logistics center — is part of the broader story of our tribe, the region and my life. I was born at Norton Air Force Base. For many decades my grandfather and members of our tribal family worked at the base and were part of the extended Norton community. The closure of the base impacted a lot of friends and family and the…

Man killed in Pomona hit-and-run

POMONA — Police are investigating a fatal hit and run collision in Pomona. Officers were called at 11:48 p.m. Friday to Mission Boulevard and La Mesa Street, where they located a man who was suffering from serious injuries, according to a Pomona Police Department spokesman. Paramedics arrived to render aid to the victim, but the man was pronounced dead at the scene, authorities said. Identification was being withheld pending notification of next of kin. The suspect’s vehicle make, model and color are unknown at this time. Anyone with information about the collision was encouraged to call the Pomona Police Department’s Traffic Services Bureau at 909-802-7741 or 909-620-2048.

Presidential campaign buttons will be topic of Temecula Valley Historical Society program

Mark Bellnap of Temecula shows some of his collection of campaign buttons. He will give a presentation on “Historic Presidential Campaign Buttons” July 26, 2021, at the Vail Headquarters stage in Temecula. (Photo by Rebecca Farnbach, Temecula Valley Historical Society) Temecula resident Mark Bellnap of Temecula will give a presentation on “Historic Presidential Campaign Buttons” 7 p.m. Monday, July 26, at the Vail Headquarters stage in Temecula. Bellnap will show campaign buttons from his collection and will give some as prizes to those who answer his trivia questions correctly. The Temecula Valley Historical Society is sponsoring the free outdoor event. Those attending should bring chairs. In his nonpartisan, nonpolitical presentation, Bellnap will focus on issues of concern depicted on historic campaign medals and buttons and will tell related anecdotes, according to a news release. The audience will receive handouts showing pictures of specific campaign medals and buttons mentioned during the presentation. The program will include topics related to elections from 1844 to 1980, with no discussion of current political issues in the United States. These are campaign buttons from the collection of Mark Bellnap of…

$5 pet adoptions offered through Riverside County Animal Services

Riverside County Animal Services is offering a Felines-n-Fido adoption special through July 31, with the adoption fee for dogs and cats reduced to $5. The special comes at a time when the number of animals in the county’s shelters has spiked. As of July 19, there were more than 600 animals at the Western Riverside County/City Animal Shelter in Jurupa Valley and nearly 150 at the Coachella Valley Animal Campus in Thousand Palms, according to a news release. During the heart of the pandemic, the Jurupa Valley shelter was hovering at about 150 displaced animals, and the Thousand Palms facility averaged 50. “We loved watching so many pets get adopted during COVID-19 lockdowns when everyone was at home and could love their new family members with undivided attention,” Julie Bank, Animal Services director, said in the news release. “Now we’re hoping that those without animals might consider adopting or fostering a pet. We need the help.” The $5 adoption fee will include the usual adoption package: spay or neuter surgery, vaccinations and a microchip. Dog adopters will have to purchase a license if they live…

Retired Fontana city manager tapped as top aide for San Bernardino County supervisor

Former Fontana City Manager Ken Hunt, paid nearly $1 million by the city in 2020 even though he didn’t work a single day that year, has been offered a job as chief of staff for San Bernardino County Supervisor Janice Rutherford at a salary of more than $156,000. Hunt, who was the highest paid city manager in the state in 2020 despite having “retired” the year before, would receive a base salary of $156,000 as Rutherford’s top aide and more than $96,000 in benefits, for a compensation package totaling more than $252,000. San Bernardino County 2nd District Supervisor Janice Rutherford (Courtesy Photo) After serving 10 years as a Fontana city councilwoman, Rutherford was elected in November 2010 as supervisor for the county’s 2nd District, which includes the cities of Rancho Cucamonga and Fontana and the mountain communities of Lake Arrowhead and Crestline. She said she worked with Hunt for a decade and called him one of the “smartest and most ethical men” she knows, and felt he would be a good fit for the job. “I only have 17 months left in office, so it’s…

Here’s how federal funding could help your Inland community

Millions of federal dollars for smart freeway traffic meters, affordable housing, water for Big Bear Lake and other projects would flow to the Inland Empire through 12 spending bills recently passed by House of Representatives committees. The bills include items on Inland lawmakers’ wish lists for Community Project Funding, which replaced the old earmarks system. The House Appropriations Committee passed the bills, and the full House is scheduled to take up the spending package the week of July 26. The Senate also needs to pass its own spending bill, and differences between the Senate and House versions need to be worked out and a compromise passed by both chambers before going to President Joe Biden for his signature. Here’s a district-by-district look at some of the Inland spending items that made it out of committee. $5 million is including in a House spending bill for smart traffic meters on northbound Interstate 15 on-ramps in Riverside County (File photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG). A performer entertains children at the dA Center for the Arts in Pomona, which is slated to get $125,000 for early learning…

Riverside wants to avoid ‘divide’ between street vendors, brick-and-mortar shops

Ernesto Cajina passed a taco stand along Riverside’s Chicago Avenue as he left work Thursday, July 22, with his car window down. “I just drove by and got a whiff, and I said, ‘I got to stop,’” said Cajina, who lives in Jurupa Valley. “It sure smells good.” So he pulled over and bought three tacos — two with beef and one with chicken — at the temporary stand set up behind the sidewalk beneath portable shelters. Cajina was hardly the only customer. Dozens of others sampled tacos and the stand’s specialty — a thick layer of sizzling meat and melted cheese spread over a bed of potatoes in an aluminum pan. Street vendors’ stands and carts are a familiar sight across the Inland Empire. And officials in the region’s largest city are crafting an ordinance to create a more inviting business climate for the roving entrepreneurs. People wait in line to buy fresh hot tacos at a taco stand on Chicago Avenue near Parkview Nursery in Riverside on Thursday, July 22, 2021. (Photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) From left cooks Angel Cabrera and…

Historic Lakeman House in Old Town Murrieta will be torn down

A historic home, built more than 130 years ago, in Old Town Murrieta will be demolished. The Murrieta City Council this week unanimously approved the permit for demolition of the historic Lakeman House, once occupied by early German immigrants. The home stands on the corner of Juniper St. and Washington Avenue — once a part of the old U.S. Highway 395 — and at one time included a lunchroom for travelers. The current Lakeman House owners — a group of investors who bought the land several years ago — want to renovate it into a dining and entertainment space that will pay homage to the property’s history. “We did an anthropological and cultural study with the city to make sure there wouldn’t be a loss of anything significantly historical,” said Casey Jurado, one of the property owners, who said the demolition and restoration is part of a longtime plan “to redevelop and restore downtown Murrieta — utilizing its historical and cultural value.” The Lakeman House, one of two historic homes in Murrieta’s old town district, was identified as a “potentially significant historic resource” in 1983 by…

2,461 migrant children at Pomona shelter reunited with family and sponsors

The number of migrant children moving from an emergency shelter at Fairplex into homes with relatives or sponsors has more than doubled in the past three weeks, officials said Friday, July 23. A total of 2,461 children who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border alone have been reunified with families or other sponsors, according to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services emergency intake site spokesperson Monik Williams. The latest figure is more than double the number officials last reported, 1,160, on July 2. Additionally, 290 children have been transferred to other sites. The number of minors who remain at the shelter, meanwhile, has dropped to 592, a substantial decrease from 1,381 on July 2, Williams wrote in an email Friday. In total, the number of children served at the Pomona site to date is 3,340. The latest census count comes as news that the migrant shelter at the Long Beach Convention Center ended operations Friday. Mayor Robert Garcia announced that all of the remaining children who have been housed at the emergency intake site were either reunited or transferred to smaller HHS reunification facilities. None are expected…

Riverside County steps up messaging about COVID-19 vaccines in communities of color

Riverside County has entered into a contract for $270,500 with two marketing companies which officials hope will develop culturally-appropriate messaging to encourage and increase COVID-19 vaccinations in Latino, African American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities. The county has signed a $226,500 contract with Traffik, an Irvine-based advertising agency, and Tzunu Strategies in Riverside, which develops messaging for communities of color, said county spokesperson Brooke Federico. Traffik will act as the media buyer and place the advertisements to reach communities of interest, she said. “The intent of hiring these marketing agencies is to create messaging that is culturally relevant and will resonate with these communities,” Federico said. “We want to see more residents of color vaccinated and protected against COVID-19.” She said since vaccine distribution began early this year, county officials have been working with nonprofits that serve communities of color and faith leaders, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, to relay the importance of vaccinations. Related links Why are so few people getting vaccinated in the Inland Empire? This is why Riverside County had to correct inaccuracies in COVID-19 data Southern California would be back…

Migrant shelter at Long Beach Convention Center closes after housing 1,538 children

The migrant shelter at the Long Beach Convention Center has closed, Mayor Robert Garcia announced Friday, July 23, more than a week before the end of the site’s contract. Since the shelter first opened in April, 1,538 migrant children have moved through the facility and the vast majority of them are now with family members or sponsors. About 150 of them, though, were transferred to smaller sites run by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as another step in the process of unifying them with family. Mayor Robert Garcia addresses the media about the current status of the migrant shelter at the Long Beach Convention Center in Downtown Long Beach, CA, on Friday, July 23, 2021. (Photo by Tracey Roman, Contributing Photographer) Mayor Robert Garcia addresses the media about the current status of the migrant shelter at the Long Beach Convention Center in Downtown Long Beach, CA, on Friday, July 23, 2021. (Photo by Tracey Roman, Contributing Photographer) William Dunne, UCLA Health, addresses the media about the the migrant shelter at the Long Beach Convention Center in Downtown Long Beach, CA, on Friday,…

Marines swim through surf in new training program as AAVs return to use in water following deadly accident

For the first time since nine men died when their amphibious assault vehicle sank during training off San Clemente Island nearly a year ago, infantry Marines at Camp Pendleton were recently back in the water in the seafaring armored vehicles. Some of the training the Marines are going through is now required after an investigation into the causes of the AAV accident, which was the deadliest training accident in the history of the vehicle’s use by the Marine Corps. Infantry from the 1st Battalion, 5th Marines and members of the 3rd Amphibian Assault Battalion participated in the multi-week course. The program was designed to make sure Marines didn’t move on to more difficult skills before showing they were confident in their training, said 1st Lt. Kyle McGuire, with the 1st Marine Division. U.S. Marines with Co. A, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division (1st MARDIV), and Co. B, 3d Assault Amphibian Battalion, 1st MARDIV, prepare to evacuate a P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicle (AAV) during a surf qualification at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, June 30, 2021. The qualification training included a 1,000-meter swim…

What to do with 13 inoperable electric buses? Foothill Transit mulls its options

Foothill Transit will pursue returning 13 first-generation electric buses experiencing multiple mechanical problems at a cost of $5 million, the transit agency’s board voted on Friday, July 23. The buses, required to last 12 years, have carried passengers mostly in Pomona and La Verne for about seven or eight years. They could be relinquished to the Federal Transit Administration with a check for the depreciated value, explained Doran Barnes, Foothill Transit executive director. The agency has been a pioneer in swapping out compressed natural gas (CNG) buses for battery-electric ones, which reduces smog components and greenhouse gases that cause global climate change. But the agency is caught between FTA demands and the actual life of the buses. Also, the agency is one of the first in the state to begin fulfilling a state mandate for 100% zero-emission buses by 2040. “With this first fleet, we have demonstrated a technical solution that for the most part has worked, but the economics behind it didn’t work,” said Barnes, during a board meeting that included a detailed report on the fleet of 32 electric buses that indicated up…

Olympics: How the Tokyo medals differ from all others

The metal of medals The 2021 Olympic medals are made of recycled materials. Phoning it in More than 1,600 municipalities in Japan participated in the “Tokyo 2020 Medal Project” to collect used laptops and mobile phones. The project was the first in history to involve citizens in the production of medals, and to manufacture the medals using all recycled metals. After collecting 78,985 tons of materials from about 6.2 million devices; 70 pounds of gold, 7,716 pounds of silver and 4,850 pounds of bronze were used to make more than 5,000 medals. The 2021 Olympics used household plastic and marine plastic waste to create podiums for the medal ceremonies, and produced Olympic Torch relay uniforms with recycled plastic bottles.

Dodgers’ Trevor Bauer appears in court over sex assault allegations

LOS ANGELES — Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Trevor Bauer appeared in court Friday to fight the extension of a protective order sought by a woman who says he choked her to the point where she lost consciousness and punched her during two sexual encounters earlier this year in his Pasadena home. Attorneys for Bauer and the woman revealed during a brief morning court session that they intend to call witnesses and argue over the order in what amounts to a trial that is expected to last three days. The court hearing is expected to resume Friday afternoon, but a judge could decide to postpone the proceedings. A temporary restraining order keeping Bauer away from the woman was issued until the hearing could be held. A judge could decide to extend that by weeks or years. Bauer’s appearance Friday was not required, nor was it expected. It’s not clear whether he will take the stand. Hearings over restraining orders are normally brief, and lawyers often appear without their clients. The pitcher’s agents, Jon Fetterolf and Rachel Luba, have disputed the allegations and Fetterolf has said his…

Rodents, roaches, failing on probation: Restaurant closures, inspections in Riverside County, July 16-22

Here are the restaurants and other food facilities that Riverside County Department of Environmental Health inspectors temporarily shut down because of imminent health hazards between July 16 and 22, 2021. If no reopening date is mentioned, the department had not listed that facility as reopened as of this publication. Red Ginger Chinese Bistro, 1185 Magnolia Ave., Corona Closed: July 22 Grade: 84/B, failing Reason: Failing an inspection on probation. There was one critical violation for raw chicken, raw beef and bean sprouts being at unsafe temperatures in a refrigerator that was impounded for not working. Among the nine lesser violations, there were fruit flies in alcohol (a repeat issue) and a condensation leak in the walk-in freezer. The restaurant was placed on probation in 2020 after three failed inspections and one closure in two years. This is the third time it has failed an inspection and been shut down while on probation; the other two times were in September and March. Los Novillos Market, 2650 Main St., Riverside (partial closure) Closed: July 22 Grade: 80/B, failing Reason: Cockroach infestation. The inspector saw numerous live and…

Plans to change incentives for rooftop solar draw backlash

With the state considering sweeping reductions in rooftop solar incentives for new users, advocates of the current program are warning the move would undercut the state’s drive to 100% clean energy and compromise other benefits of the homeowner panels. But proponents of the changes — which include private electric companies as well as a prominent environmental group — argue that the incentives are unfairly paid for by non-solar customers, who often have lower incomes than those who buy solar units. Thanks to the steadily declining cost of solar panels, users currently recoup the cost of their panels in three to five years, according to the California Public Utilities Commission. Their bills are subsidized, largely because they receive high rates for the surplus energy they sell back to the utilities for years after the panels have been paid off. “A three- to five-year payback for something that lasts 30 years is like winning the lottery,” said Mohit Chhabra, an energy scientist with the Natural Resources Defense Council, an environmental advocacy group. Chhabra is lead author of the council’s proposal to provide a better deal for non-solar users…

California Dolphin