Hemet Little League kicks off season

Little League baseball is back in Hemet. Opening ceremonies and the first pitches of ball games took place Saturday, April 6. After years without Little League teams, players got back in action at Brubaker Park in the city. A Hemet Little League player hits the ball during a home run derby on Saturday, April 6, 2024, at the opening ceremony at Brubaker Park in Hemet. (Photo by Anjali Sharif-Paul/The Sun/SCNG) A Little League player runs off the field on Saturday, April 6, 2024, during the home run derby at the opening ceremony event at Brubaker Park in Hemet. (Photo by Anjali Sharif-Paul/The Sun/SCNG) Little League players practice before their games on Saturday, April 6, 2024, at Brubaker Park in Hemet. The season kicked off Saturday with the opening ceremony. (Photo by Anjali Sharif-Paul/The Sun/SCNG) Hemet Little League players wait for their turn in a home run derby on Saturday, April 6, 2024, during the opening ceremony at Brubaker Park in Hemet. (Photo by Anjali Sharif-Paul/The Sun/SCNG) The opening ceremonies for Hemet Little League at Brubaker Park on Saturday, April 6, 2024, also brought other fun

LASD continues search near Azusa for hiker missing since March 9

Search efforts are ongoing to locate a hiker missing nearly a month and last seen in the area of the Bridge to Nowhere and San Gabriel River north of Azusa, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. “The search continues, and the next area of interest will be the reservoir downstream which will be searched methodically moving forward,” said Michael Leum, assistant director of the Community Partnerships Bureau/Reserve Forces Detail, which is the sheriff’s bureau that coordinates efforts involving civilian volunteers and search and rescue operations. Leum said the area of focus is about 5 miles of challenging terrain and wet conditions due to winter storms. “While efforts are constant and ongoing, there are more hours spent searching on the weekends when the volunteer (search and rescue team) members are available,” Leum said.  With the assistance of fellow rescue teams, outside agencies and specialists, @SDMLASD Mountain Rescue Team members continued their search of the Bridge to Nowhere trailhead and San Gabriel River for a missing hiker. See full story: https://t.co/FWyGo5Pfat pic.twitter.com/kfHJgscKYD — LA County Sheriffs (@LASDHQ) March 30, 2024 On March 9, 59-year-old Rona

California Citrus State Historic Park in Riverside celebrates 30 years

California Citrus State Historic Park in Riverside marked its 30th anniversary with a celebration of the region’s famous industry. A rainbow appears over California Citrus State Historic Park Friday, April 5, 2024, in Riverside during the 30th anniversary celebration. (Photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A couple arrives Friday, April 5, 2024, to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the California Citrus State Historic Park in Riverside. (Photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A park ranger reads an interpretive presentation as Riverside Swing Ensemble performs Friday, April 5, 2024, during the 30th anniversary celebration of California Citrus State Historic Park in Riverside. (Photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Riverside Swing Ensemble performs Friday, April 5, 2024, during Citrus Fest, the 30th anniversary celebration of the California Citrus State Historic Park in Riverside. (Photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) Those in attendance listen to Riverside Swing Ensemble on Friday, April 5, 2024, during the California Citrus State Historic Park’s 30th anniversary celebration in Riverside. (Photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG) A couple listens to Riverside Swing Ensemble on Friday, April 5, 2024, during Citrus Fest, the 30th

20 arrested after students occupy administration building at Pomona College in support of Palestinians

Students at Pomona College occupied an administration building on Friday afternoon, refusing to obey college officials’ demands that they leave during a protest in support of Palestinians. Twenty people were arrested, according to the Claremont Police Department. The protest at Alexander Hall was organized by the student-led group Pomona Divest from Apartheid. More than 150 students were participating, as of late afternoon, about 50 of them on the steps of Alexander Hall or clustered around the entry, with the rest on the sidewalk. They chanted and clapped along. Among the chants:  “Stop the killing, stop the slaughter, Gaza has no food or water!” and “Up, up with liberation. Down, down with occupation!” A news release from Pomona Divest from Apartheid said that roughly 18 students entered Alexander Hall around 4:10 p.m. in response to the college’s removal of its Apartheid Wall. A statement from Claremont police said an estimated 30-40 protesters entered the building. “Pomona is taking down the wall,” read an afternoon post on the group’s Instagram account, @pomonadivestapartheid. It called for others to come join the effort. One student on scene during the

19 arrested after students occupy administration building at Pomona College in support of Palestinians

Students at Pomona College occupied an administration building on Friday afternoon, refusing to obey college officials’ demands that they leave during a protest in support of Palestinians. Nineteen people were arrested, according to the Claremont Police Department. The protest at Alexander Hall was organized by the student-led group Pomona Divest from Apartheid. More than 150 students were participating, as of late afternoon, about 50 of them on the steps of Alexander Hall or clustered around the entry, with the rest on the sidewalk. They chanted and clapped along. Among the chants:  “Stop the killing, stop the slaughter, Gaza has no food or water!” and “Up, up with liberation. Down, down with occupation!” A news release from Pomona Divest from Apartheid said that roughly 18 students entered Alexander Hall around 4:10 p.m. in response to the college’s removal of its Apartheid Wall. A statement from Claremont police said an estimated 30-40 protesters entered the building. “Pomona is taking down the wall,” read an afternoon post on the group’s Instagram account, @pomonadivestapartheid. It called for others to come join the effort. One student on scene during the

Inland Empire Doll Club will hold ‘Dolls Through the Ages’ show and sale

The Inland Empire Doll Club will present “Dolls Through the Ages,” its annual doll show and sale, 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. April 13 at the Janet Goeske Center, 5257 Sierra St., Riverside. The event will offer a variety of dolls, toys and bears for sale, from antique to modern and including Barbie dolls and ball-jointed dolls. The club will provide free doll appraisals from 1 to 2:30 p.m., with a limit of two items per person, according to a news release. Doll repair will also be available, and there will be more than 50 sales tables and a snack bar. Admission is $5 for adults and $2 for children younger than 12. There is a $1 discount for seniors, members of the United Federation of Doll Clubs and those who bring a soft doll or toy to donate for the club’s charities. Free parking is available, and the center is accessible to the handicapped. The Inland Empire Doll Club uses proceeds from the sale to support various charities in the community. For information, call Judy at 951-264-2732.

‘Eyes of Manhattan on 9/11’ will be topic for SAGE Society of Hemet

Retired Hemet firefighter Scott Hudson will present “Eyes of Manhattan on 9/11 – The World Trade Center Through the Eyes of a Safety Officer” when the SAGE Society of Hemet meets 2 p.m. Tuesday, April 9, in the Ramona Room of the Miller-Jones Mortuary, 1501 W. Florida Ave., Hemet. Hudson, who was a safety officer for FEMA’s Urban Search & Rescue Team/Task Force 6 (Riverside), served on ground zero for 10 days immediately following 9/11. During that time, he had access to areas not always accessible to the media, according to a news release. In his presentation, he will show some of his photos from the aftermath of 9/11 and tell of his experiences working at ground zero. Hudson served more than 35 years in fire service roles, including as a damage controlman in the U.S. Coast Guard and as an engine and crash truck driver for the Norton Air Force Base Fire Department in San Bernardino. He also served 29 years with the Hemet Fire Department and has taught classes in fire technology, safety management and terrorism at Mt. San Jacinto College and the

5 takeaways from March 5 primary election in Inland Empire

One month later, the March 5 primary election is officially over in the Inland Empire. Primary votes in Riverside and San Bernardino counties took almost a month to count, a process drawn out by policies to ensure accurate results and make voting widely accessible. The results show a local electorate that showed up in relatively low numbers, but made choices that shook up city councils and perhaps set the stage for a mini-political dynasty. California’s secretary of state is expected to certify election results by April 12. Here are five takeaways from the Inland Empire’s primary. Lower than low Primaries tend to have lower voter turnout than general elections. California’s 2024 primary is no exception. Statewide, 35% of voters cast ballots on or before March 5, according to the secretary of state. Turnout was even lower in the Inland Empire, with just 30.8% of Riverside County voters and 26.2% of San Bernardino County voters mailing in a ballot or voting early or on Election Day. A number of factors could explain voter apathy. Before the primary, we pretty much knew Joe Biden and Donald Trump

Students from across California meet in Ontario for SkillsUSA competition

Over 3,000 students from throughout California competed Friday, April 5, in the 57th Annual SkillsUSA State Leadership and Skills Conference. SkillsUSA, a national nonprofit, works with educators and schools to prepare and empower students to explore career opportunities in various trades. Students participated in 120 competitions, displaying their skills in multiple technical areas such as manufacturing, construction, barbering and robotics. Granite Hills High School students Aiden Walker Butler and Hayden Rice supervised by Judged Greg Gallagher use a simulator to wire a mechatronics system while competing in the 57th Annual SkillsUSA State Leadership and Skills Conference at Ontario Convention Center on Friday April 5, 2024. (Photo by Milka Soko, Contributing Photographer) Summit High School’s Selene Butalid and Kyara Ortego participate in the video competion during the 57th Annual SkillsUSA State Leadership and Skills Conference at Ontario Convention Center on Friday April 5, 2024. (Photo by Milka Soko, Contributing Photographer) King High School’s Anastasia Niemeier and Owen O’Rafferty program a robot to complete a task during the 57th Annual SkillsUSA State Leadership and Skills Conference at Ontario Convention Center on Friday April 5, 2024. (Photo by

31st Annual Children’s Hospital Foundation Gala Raises More Than $1 Million

Local community members gathered at the Riverside Convention Center on Thursday, April 4 for the 31st anniversary Foundation Gala presented by Laurena and Darrell Bolden with Alaina Mathews, raising more than $1 million to support Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital. “We are overwhelmed with gratitude for the support of our community,” said Peter Baker, senior vice president and administrator for Children’s Hospital. “Each dollar raised truly makes a difference and has allowed us to continue in our mission of caring for the most vulnerable patients.” Under the theme “Saddle Up for Miracles,” attendees embraced the spirit of unity and compassion. It provided a platform to showcase the Stronger Together campaign, marking a significant milestone. This initiative focuses on cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment services, with the goal of offering personalized care to every child in need. Plans include the acquisition of state-of-the-art clinical equipment and the construction of a Pediatric Outpatient Specialty Clinic to streamline access to a wide range of specialized services. The gala honored individuals who have demonstrated outstanding dedication to children’s healthcare: Richard E. Chinnock, MD, was awarded the prestigious Shirley N.

Tesla to Build Collision Service Center in the City of San Bernardino

Tesla Motors and ViaWest Group have announced that they will be building a state-of-the-art Collision Service Center in the City of San Bernardino. This marks the first Tesla Collision Service Center in the Inland Empire, with their nearest collision facilities currently in Aliso Viejo, San Juan Capistrano, and Santa Monica. The 30,000 square foot collision center will be located at 424 West Orange Show Lane near E Street. “Having Tesla in San Bernardino is a big win for the Inland Empire,” said Mayor Helen Tran. “There are more and more Tesla’s on the road every day, and not having to travel to L.A. or Orange Counties is very appealing for local and potential owners.” The project was approved by the San Bernardino Planning Commission on February 13. However, Tesla’s involvement was only confirmed this week. “We are thrilled to partner with Tesla in developing this state-of-the-art Collision Service Center in San Bernardino,” said Rodney Boden, ViaWest Group’s Vice President of Investment and Development, “This facility not only represents the growing presence of Tesla in the region, but highlights ViaWest’s ability to develop cutting-edge facilities. We

3 caught with over a million fentanyl pills in El Monte plead guilty

Three men who were arrested in El Monte last year with more than 1 million fentanyl pills each pleaded guilty Tuesday to a federal narcotics charge, prosecutors announced. Florencio Camacho Allan, 29, Gerardo Gaxiola Patiño, 30, and 26-year-old Alex Valdez Oroz, all of Sinaloa, Mexico, pleaded guilty in federal court in Los Angeles to one count of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute fentanyl, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. Judge Stanley Blumenfeld Jr. scheduled an August 13 sentencing hearing. The defendants face a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in federal prison. The drug trafficking occurred between September 2022 to March 2023, according to the defendants’ plea agreements. At an unspecified date prior to March 7, 2023, a “drug broker” in Mexico connected the defendants with a prospective buyer for a transaction involving approximately 2 million fentanyl pills.  “The deal was to occur in the Los Angeles area and the buyer agreed to pay approximately 75 cents per pill,” prosecutors said. “As part of the deal, the buyer also agreed to first purchase a sample ‘box’ of approximately 10,000 fentanyl pills

Several students occupy administration building at Pomona College in support of Palestinians

Several students at Pomona College occupied an administration building on Friday afternoon, refusing to obey college officials’ demands that they leave during a protest in support of Palestinians. There were reports that some protesters were taken into custody, though police did not immediately confirm that. The protest at Alexander Hall was organized by the student-led group Pomona Divest from Apartheid. More than 150 students were participating, as of late afternoon, about 50 of them on the steps of Alexander Hall or clustered around the entry, with the rest on the sidewalk. They chanted and clapped along. Among the chants:  “Stop the killing, stop the slaughter, Gaza has no food or water!” and “Up, up with liberation. Down, down with occupation!” A news release from Pomona Divest from Apartheid said that roughly 18 students entered Alexander Hall around 4:10 p.m. in response to the college’s removal of its Apartheid Wall. “Pomona is taking down the wall,” read an afternoon post on the group’s Instagram account, @pomonadivestapartheid. It called for others to come join the effort. One student on scene during the late afternoon estimated that there

City of San Bernardino Names Rochelle Clayton as Deputy City Manager

The City of San Bernardino has announced the appointment of Rochelle Clayton as its new Deputy City Manager. Clayton, a San Bernardino native, has nearly 30 years of leadership roles with public agencies in the Inland Empire, most recently as the Assistant City Manager for the City of Menifee. Her first day will be April 15. “This is a homecoming for me,” said Clayton. “I grew up here. We raised our kids here. Our girls graduated from Aquinas High School. I couldn’t be more excited to serve the residents of San Bernardino and be a part of the great things taking place.” Having spent the past five years in Menifee, Clayton oversaw the Police, Fire, Community Services, Information Technology, Finance, Human Resources, and City Clerk departments. She served as the City’s lead negotiator with developers, businesses, school districts, and labor unions. Clayton also led the development and implementation of a five-year plan to successfully transition Menifee’s municipal police services under City control and no longer the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department. “We are very pleased that Rochelle will be joining our team,” said City Manager Charles

Claremont Lewis Museum of Art plans three ‘This is not a chair’ events

The Claremont Lewis Museum of Art has three events planned in April in conjunction with its “This is not a chair” exhibit, which runs through April 21. The first is “Maloof it off the Roof” 6-7 p.m. Saturday, April 6, during the April Art Walk. During the event, artists and furniture makers will provide a variety of “chairs” to be dropped from the museum’s roof with musical accompaniment. The performance event is based on tales that, as a young furniture maker, Sam Maloof would drop his chairs from the roof of his garage to test the strength of their joints, according to a news release. The second event is Jack Rogers Hopkins Film Night at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 11. The museum will screen “Jack Rogers Hopkins: California Design Maverick,” a 30-minute documentary about the Modernist sculptor, in the Calaycay Gallery. Following the screening, there will be a discussion with Katie Nartonis, the film’s director, and Jim Rawitsch, executive director of the Sam and Alfreda Maloof Foundation for Arts and Crafts. The free program is held in conjunction with the Claremont museum’s “This is not

San Gabriel Farmers Market to begin April 27

The San Gabriel Farmers Market is set to debut later this month, offering market offers a wide variety of farm-fresh fruits and vegetables, hot foods and artisanal goods, the city announced Friday. The grand opening celebration, planned for April 27, seeks to draw San Gabriel residents and visitors to shop from more than 20 vendors, according to the city. The market will continue every Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the San Gabriel Park and Ride Lot, 257 S. Mission Dr. “As a special treat, the first 50 shoppers each Saturday until May 25 will receive a free San Gabriel Farmers Market tote bag,” officials said. Street parking and additional parking at the Mission Playhouse is available. Market vendors accept EBT and WIC payment methods “to support income-qualified and senior visitors,” city officials said. Pets are not permitted at the market, but service animals are welcome, officials said. Questions about the event should be sent to farmersmarket@sgch.org, and a list of vendors is online at sangabrieled.com/farmersmarket. The post San Gabriel Farmers Market to begin April 27 appeared first on Hey SoCal. Change is

Caltrans puts up fences to deter illegal dumping in SFV, Pasadena

Caltrans on Tuesday announced the completion of a $1.3 million project in the north San Fernando Valley and Pasadena that installed new fences to combat illegal dumping, bolster litter collection and remove graffiti. Via the Clean California initiative, “more durable and visually appealing fencing” is now up along stretches of the Golden State (5) Freeway, Interstate 210 and the 118 Freeway, according to Caltrans. “These fencing improvements capture the vision of Clean California by improving infrastructure in both form and function,” Caltrans Director Tony Tavares said in a statement. “Protecting freeway access and roadside cleanliness from illegal dumping lifts community spirit and provides a better transportation experience for everyone.”  Gov. Gavin Newsom’s Clean California initiative is a $1.2 billion, multiyear clean-up effort that directs Caltrans to remove trash and “transform and beautify public spaces,” officials said. Eight locations received new fencing: Sylmar — along the northbound 5 Freeway at Hubbard Street and near the I-210 interchange; Arleta — along I-5 on the southbound side of Paxton Street; Pacoima — along the 118 Freeway from eastbound Dronefield Avenue to Foothill Boulevard; Lake View Terrace — along

As kitten season arrives, ‘Bottle Baby Brigade,’ scores of fosters are keeping baby felines fed

A litter of newborn kittens at the Long Beach Animal Care Services shelter. (Photo courtesy of LBACS). Anywhere between 1,200 and 1,400 kittens come into the care of Long Beach Animal Care Services during kitten season. (Photo courtesy of LBACS). A kitten awaiting its bottle feeding. Long Beach Animal Care Services takes in upwards of 1,000 kittens every year during peak kitten season. (Photo courtesy of LBACS). Motherless newborn kittens, pictured above, require round-the-clock care and feedings to survive. (Photo courtesy of Long Beach Animal Care Services). A first time Baby Bottle Brigade volunteer learns how to properly care for a newborn kitten. Neonate kittens need 24-hour care. (Photo courtesy of LBACS). Long Beach Animal Care Services encourages all residents to volunteer for its various animal fostering programs ó and most importantly, to ensure their pets are spayed and neutered. (Photo courtesy of LBACS). A litter of newborn kittens at the Long Beach Animal Care Services shelter. (Photo courtesy of LBACS). Show Caption of Expand As the weather around Southern California starts to dry out and warm up, animal-care agencies and rescues from across Southern

Here’s who won the March primary election in San Bernardino County

The votes are in. Election officials in San Bernardino and Los Angeles counties have finished processing ballots in the March 5 primary election. Now the California secretary of state must certify the results by April 12. The top two vote-getters in races for federal and state office advance to the Nov. 5 general election. Likewise, in local races where candidates do not receive a majority of the votes cast, the top two finishers advance to the November election. Here’s a look at how candidates in select races fared. Congress 23rd District Includes Adelanto, Apple Valley, Barstow, Big Bear Lake, Hesperia, Twentynine Palms, Victorville, Yucca Valley and Yucaipa and parts of Colton, Highland Loma Linda, Redlands and San Bernardino Derek Marshall (D): 36.6% Jay Obernotle (R, incumbent): 63.4% 25th District Includes Banning, Beaumont, Blythe, Cathedral City, Coachella, Desert Hot Springs, Indio, Needles, San Jacinto and part of Hemet Ryan Dean Burkett (No party preference): 1.1% Miguel Chapa (R): 5.7% Oscar Ortiz (D): 10.0% Raul Ruiz (D, incumbent): 45.1% Ceci “Cecilia” Truman (R): 17.5% Ian M. Weeks (R): 20.6% 28th District Includes Alhambra, Arcadia, Claremont, La Cañada

Riverside County’s March primary election results are in, here’s who won

Another election is in the books. Election workers in Riverside and San Bernardino counties are done counting votes from the March 5 primary election. The final results go to the California secretary of state, which has until April 12 to certify the primary. In Riverside County, election workers counted 409,269 ballots, equal to 30.84% voter turnout. Here’s a look at how Inland primary candidates did. The top two vote-getters regardless of party in races for Assembly, state Senate and Congress advance to the Nov. 5 General Election. BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 1st District Includes Good Hope, Highgrove, part of Jurupa Valley, Riverside, March Air Reserve Base, Mead Valley, Meadowbrook and Perris Richard Roth: 31.69% Jose Medina: 24.81% Debbie Walsh: 22.68% Gracie Torres: 20.82% Medina and Roth will advance to a November runoff because no one got a majority of the vote. 3rd District Includes Aguanga, Anza, De Luz, East Hemet, French Valley, Green Acres, Homeland, La Cresta, Lake Riverside, Menifee, Murrieta, Sage, Temecula, part of Valle Vista, Wildomar and Winchester Chuck Washington (incumbent): 53.32% Jonathan Ingram: 26.71% Jack Guerrero: 19.97% Washington won reelection to a four-year

Here’s who won office in the March primary election in Riverside

Five of Riverside’s eight elected offices were on the March 5 ballot. The city will see three new councilmembers, based on the County of Riverside Registrar of Voters’ official results, released Thursday evening, April 4. They include Philip Falcone in Ward 1, Steven Robillard in Ward 3 and Sean Mill — who unseated incumbent Councilmember Gaby Plascencia — in Ward 5. Mayor Patricia Lock Dawson and Ward 7 Councilmember Steve Hemenway, the latter of which ran unopposed, both won reelection in their respective races. The representatives will be sworn in during the Tuesday, April 9 council meeting. Riverside mayor Patricia Lock Dawson (incumbent): 77.62% Jessica Qattawi: 22.38% Riverside City Council Ward 1 Its neighborhoods include the Northside, Downtown, Wood Streets, Eastside and part of Hunter Industrial Park. Kayla Booker: 16.14% Philip Falcone: 51.16% Steven Lawson: 4.39% Hasaranga “Hass” Ratnayake: 18.50% David Leon Romo: 9.81% Ward 3 Its neighborhoods include Airport, Grand, Magnolia Center, Victoria and part of Ramona. Warren Avery: 46.25% Steven Robillard: 53.75% Ward 5 Its neighborhoods include Casa Blanca and parts of Ramona, Magnolia Center, Presidential Park, Arlington, Arlington South and La Sierra